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Old 06-06-2016, 04:26 PM   #1
imported_Next_Saturday
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Default Kris Kristofferson: An Outlaw at 80

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/fe...at-80-20160606

Kris Kristofferson: An Outlaw at 80

Country legend has faced memory loss and the death of old friends, and has also found peace – just don’t try to tell him what to do


Oh, my god, the son of a bitch is back," announces Lisa Kristofferson as she stands in the kitchen of her Los Flores Canyon home in Malibu. The son of a bitch, who is next to her, is more commonly known as Kris Kristofferson. He has been her husband for the past 36 years. He also happens to be one of the greatest songwriters of all time (covered by Johnny Cash, Janis Joplin, Elvis Presley and some 500 others), not to mention an iconic actor in his own right (from A Star Is Born to the Blade movies).

Three decades ago, "the son of a bitch is back" may have been the rallying cry of Kristofferson's girlfriends or wives after he went off on a drinking or cheating bender. But today, just weeks away from Kristofferson's 80th birthday, it means something different entirely.

It means that the rugged, fiercely independent spark of consciousness that is Kris Kristofferson, which has been fading for the past few years due to memory loss, is brightening again – to everyone's surprise.

For years, doctors had been telling Kristofferson that his increasingly debilitating memory loss was due to either Alzheimer's or to dementia brought on by blows to the head from the boxing, football and rugby of his teens and early twenties. Some days, Kristofferson couldn't even remember what he was doing from one moment to the next.

It became so bad that Kristofferson started writing a song about it. "I see an empty chair/Someone was sitting there," it began. "I've got a feeling it was me/And I see a glass of wine/I'm pretty sure it's mine."

But then, like the chair and the wine, he forgot about the song. And it lay unfinished like many others he's begun these past few years. In this case, his daughter Kelly completed the song, which remains unrecorded.

Then, earlier this year, a doctor decided to test Kristofferson for Lyme disease. The test came back positive. His wife believes he picked it up from a tick as he crawled around the forest floor in Vermont for six weeks while filming the movie Disappearances.

"He was taking all these medications for things he doesn't have, and they all have side effects," she says. She is wearing one of her husband's tour merchandise shirts. After he gave up his Alzheimer's and depression pills and went through three weeks of Lyme-disease treatment, Lisa was shocked. "All of a sudden he was back," she says. There are still bad days, but "some days he's perfectly normal and it's easy to forget that he is even battling anything."

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Peter Yang
Kristofferson stands next to her, alongside the kitchen counter, a black T-shirt tight on his thin but still-solid frame, his gray goatee neatly trimmed. Behind him, there is a wall covered with pen and pencil marks, denoting the growth of his children, stepchildren, grandchildren and foster children. One would imagine that he'd be elated by his unexpected recovery.

"Yeah," he replies, unconvincingly, when asked.

So you were never scared about losing your past? Kristofferson stares straight ahead, into a sweeping ocean vista, his sky-blue eyes shining brightly under a brow that thrusts out like a rock ledge. "What good would it do?" he says with a shrug.

Seventeen years ago, Kristofferson had bypass surgery. As he was being wheeled into the operating room, the doctor told Kris and Lisa that this would be a good place to say goodbye. "I hope it's not goodbye," Lisa said.

His response: "So what if it is?"

This blunt, fatalistic streak is something Kristofferson has carried with him for most of his life like a birthmark. It's one reason directors like Martin Scorsese and Sam Peckinpah have cast him in their films.

"I really have no anxiety about controlling my own life," Kristofferson says, taking a seat at the head of a wood dining table. "Somehow I just slipped into it and it's worked. It's not up to me – or you. I feel very lucky that [life]'s lasted so long because I've done so many things that could have knocked me out of it. But somehow I just always have the feeling that He knows what He's doing. It's been good so far, and it'll probably continue to be."

He pauses. "Now as soon as I said that, of course..." He looks upward as if a lightning bolt is on its way down to strike him.

And there he goes: Just on the verge of a happy ending, Kristofferson imagines the worst will happen instead. It's a theme that runs through many of his best-known songs. Saturday nights end in Sunday hangovers ("Sunday Mornin' Coming Down"). Great relationships end, leaving lifelong regret as their legacy ("Loving Her Was Easier [Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again]," "Me and Bobby McGee"). The perfect lover who sweeps a woman off her feet is destined to abandon her, robbing her of body, soul and pride ("The Taker").

To spark his memory, Kristofferson has been going through all these old songs again. A box set of his first 11 albums, The Complete Monument & Columbia Album Collection, due on June 10th, rests on the counter. He has been listening to it album by album to get reacquainted with his life's work. "It just takes you back like a picture of something would," he says.
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