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Old 05-09-2007, 09:32 AM   #1
doctorpilsxhp
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Here is an update from VIA rail about the possibility of arranging a group trip (The Corfid Express) from Vancouver to Toronto in 2008.

I put out the feeler some time ago about the possibility of those Lightheads interested in gathering in Vancouver in 2008 and taking the VIA train to Toronto. We could experience firsthand the spirit of 'The Canadian Railroad Trilogy' on the way to Gord's Massey Hall concerts. This would also be a celebration of Gord's 70th birthday. A chance to meet, celebrate, sing and honour our common musical idol.

My first inquiry to VIA by snail-mail went unanswered. I finally did receive the message posted below with some specifics to help us narrow down the costs and other logistics.

VIA's rates for 2007 appear in the message but are subject to change for 2008. VIA could not project to 2008, regardless, this is a pretty good ballpark figure to work with.

To narrow down the actual costs the group should:

1) get a commitment from the number of individuals who are serious about undertaking such a trip. This would obviously depend on the actual dates of Gord's 2008 concerts.

2) decide what kind of accommodations you wish to have. Who will share rooms, upper or lower berths etc.

Individuals can do their own rough calculations as to their travel expenses from home to Vancouver, the cost of a hotel before VIA's departure, the cost of the train package selected and the cost of accommodation, Massey tickets, food and trip home.

The rates depend on having a group of at least 20 participants so make a decision and for those committed, start saving your pennies.

(you can refer to my previous posts (January?) on this subject to review my initial ballpark breakdown of costs}

Have fun guys!

**************************************************
Thank you for your interest in VIA Rail group travel . I'm sorry for the delay , we are experiencing a higher volume of, Thank you for your interest in VIA Rail group travel. I'm sorry for the delay , we are experiencing a higher volume of
requests than expected.

Here is the information that you requested.

When travelling in Sleeping accommodation on the Canadian , all meals are included in the rate. 1 Sleeping car will accommodate 21 passengers ( 3 Upper berths, 3 Lower berths , 3 Single Bedrooms and 6 Double Bedrooms ) .

The 2007 group fare ( 20 + ) for travel between Vancouver and Toronto one way tax included is :
The 2007 rates are subject to change if purchased later than November 10, 2007.

Prices are subject to change without notice.

These are the Super saver rates , therefore no difference between an Adult and a Senior .

Upper Berth : $ 867.08
Lower Berth : $ 1,019.72
Single Bedroom : $ 1,308.04
Double Bedroom : $ 1,308.04 per person based on double occupancy

The schedule departures from Vancouver to Toronto are Tuesday, Friday and Sunday only

Trn # 002 - Dep. Vancouver 5:30 p.m. Arr. Toronto 8:00 p.m. 3 days later

Sleeping Car space is at a premium , if interested a booking should be confirmed as soon as possible . Full payment for groups is due 30 days prior to departure.

If any additional group information is required or you would like to secure a booking, do not hesitate to contact us.

Thank you and best regards,
Annette, Group Sales ( Moncton )
VIA Rail Canada
1-506-859-3907 outside Canada and U.S.A
1-888-842-0744 within Canada and U.S.A.
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:32 AM   #2
Yuri
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Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 618
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Here is an update from VIA rail about the possibility of arranging a group trip (The Corfid Express) from Vancouver to Toronto in 2008.

I put out the feeler some time ago about the possibility of those Lightheads interested in gathering in Vancouver in 2008 and taking the VIA train to Toronto. We could experience firsthand the spirit of 'The Canadian Railroad Trilogy' on the way to Gord's Massey Hall concerts. This would also be a celebration of Gord's 70th birthday. A chance to meet, celebrate, sing and honour our common musical idol.

My first inquiry to VIA by snail-mail went unanswered. I finally did receive the message posted below with some specifics to help us narrow down the costs and other logistics.

VIA's rates for 2007 appear in the message but are subject to change for 2008. VIA could not project to 2008, regardless, this is a pretty good ballpark figure to work with.

To narrow down the actual costs the group should:

1) get a commitment from the number of individuals who are serious about undertaking such a trip. This would obviously depend on the actual dates of Gord's 2008 concerts.

2) decide what kind of accommodations you wish to have. Who will share rooms, upper or lower berths etc.

Individuals can do their own rough calculations as to their travel expenses from home to Vancouver, the cost of a hotel before VIA's departure, the cost of the train package selected and the cost of accommodation, Massey tickets, food and trip home.

The rates depend on having a group of at least 20 participants so make a decision and for those committed, start saving your pennies.

(you can refer to my previous posts (January?) on this subject to review my initial ballpark breakdown of costs}

Have fun guys!

**************************************************
Thank you for your interest in VIA Rail group travel . I'm sorry for the delay , we are experiencing a higher volume of, Thank you for your interest in VIA Rail group travel. I'm sorry for the delay , we are experiencing a higher volume of
requests than expected.

Here is the information that you requested.

When travelling in Sleeping accommodation on the Canadian , all meals are included in the rate. 1 Sleeping car will accommodate 21 passengers ( 3 Upper berths, 3 Lower berths , 3 Single Bedrooms and 6 Double Bedrooms ) .

The 2007 group fare ( 20 + ) for travel between Vancouver and Toronto one way tax included is :
The 2007 rates are subject to change if purchased later than November 10, 2007.

Prices are subject to change without notice.

These are the Super saver rates , therefore no difference between an Adult and a Senior .

Upper Berth : $ 867.08
Lower Berth : $ 1,019.72
Single Bedroom : $ 1,308.04
Double Bedroom : $ 1,308.04 per person based on double occupancy

The schedule departures from Vancouver to Toronto are Tuesday, Friday and Sunday only

Trn # 002 - Dep. Vancouver 5:30 p.m. Arr. Toronto 8:00 p.m. 3 days later

Sleeping Car space is at a premium , if interested a booking should be confirmed as soon as possible . Full payment for groups is due 30 days prior to departure.

If any additional group information is required or you would like to secure a booking, do not hesitate to contact us.

Thank you and best regards,
Annette, Group Sales ( Moncton )
VIA Rail Canada
1-506-859-3907 outside Canada and U.S.A
1-888-842-0744 within Canada and U.S.A.
__________________
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:58 AM   #3
charlene
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and fittingly in todays SUN is this article!
lol
http://www.torontosun.com/Travel/Can...65277-sun.html

I'll be taking the train to Massey as usual..the GO train from Whitby to Toronto - about 7 bucks..!
lol
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:58 AM   #4
charlene
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and fittingly in todays SUN is this article!
lol
http://www.torontosun.com/Travel/Can...65277-sun.html

I'll be taking the train to Massey as usual..the GO train from Whitby to Toronto - about 7 bucks..!
lol
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Old 05-09-2007, 01:02 PM   #5
Gitchigumee
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I am planning on doing this trip. When will we know when the Massey concerts will be in 2008? I have a conflict with the last half of May '08 so I will keep my fingers crossed that it's not then. From a sightseers perspective, I would think July or August would be preferable for a train ride across Canada, but I'm sure it's beautiful any time of the year.

And Yuri, welcome back! I've missed you!

[ May 09, 2007, 13:12: Message edited by: Gitchigumee ]
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:23 PM   #6
johnfowles
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Having just made our expensive foray down under I doubt that we will be one of the party
plus as you will see below "been there done that"
my main recommendation is to pack a few packs of cards and gen up on a few card games
as a never ending succesion of vistas of prairie rivers and lakes does get tedious
This topic had been ominously neglected for a while but I was reminded of it by a fine article that I spotted in my weekly Travel Telegraph email which brought a link entitled
"In the tracks of Canada's luckiest settlers" at:-
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/ma...tcanada104.xml
It describes travelling from Halifax to Vancouver,
Here are a few quotes from that article and I will add few slide scans from my return journey from Montreal to Vancouver by car and back by CNR (now VIA RAIL) in July 1966
A transcript of my father's notes from this, his "holiday of a lifetime" is at:-
http://www.johnfowles.org.uk/1966/
We drove 3750 miles in a "drive-away" 1964 Buick Wildcat that had to be delivered to a dealer in Vancouver

The Wildcat at a dominion Supermarket in London Ontario, note the skyline of Detroit in the background.
Then after an enjoyable few days visiting old friends of my parents in Vancouver it was time to load our luggage on the CNR train for the somewhat tedious journey back East

my fanmily plus Gordon and Irene Dowty behind the luggage cart.
"I chose the later dinner seating so that I didn't miss the views of Mount Robson, the Rockies' highest peak, from the dome car"

My view from the dome car
"Jasper - at the heart of the one of the Rockies' four major national parks - is, with the exception of the gorgeous Jasper Park Lodge, a plain little town. The surrounding wilderness is the attraction. As I disembarked four elk were grazing on the platform

CNR diesel 6782 at rest at Jasper station in July 1966.
Note no elk visible!! But can you smell the fresh mountain air!!!
"We were scheduled to arrive in Vancouver at 8am. That $23 fare bought the 1938 traveller a ticket to what has been called "the village at the edge of the rainforest".

Where the Rainforest Meets the Sea on Vancouver Island

A view on the way to the Daintree (rainforest World Heritage site's Discovery Cantre)
where the Daintree river flows into the Coral Sea on the Queensland shore (the famed GBR Great Barrier Reef is just over the horizon)

"and.. it was on its way to becoming Canada's "lotus land" - the dream destination of every cold, bored prairie dweller and every hard-up kid from the Maritimes."
Ron Jones take a bow!!

[ June 07, 2007, 14:15: Message edited by: johnfowles ]
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:23 PM   #7
johnfowles
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Having just made our expensive foray down under I doubt that we will be one of the party
plus as you will see below "been there done that"
my main recommendation is to pack a few packs of cards and gen up on a few card games
as a never ending succesion of vistas of prairie rivers and lakes does get tedious
This topic had been ominously neglected for a while but I was reminded of it by a fine article that I spotted in my weekly Travel Telegraph email which brought a link entitled
"In the tracks of Canada's luckiest settlers" at:-
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/ma...tcanada104.xml
It describes travelling from Halifax to Vancouver,
Here are a few quotes from that article and I will add few slide scans from my return journey from Montreal to Vancouver by car and back by CNR (now VIA RAIL) in July 1966
A transcript of my father's notes from this, his "holiday of a lifetime" is at:-
http://www.johnfowles.org.uk/1966/
We drove 3750 miles in a "drive-away" 1964 Buick Wildcat that had to be delivered to a dealer in Vancouver

The Wildcat at a dominion Supermarket in London Ontario, note the skyline of Detroit in the background.
Then after an enjoyable few days visiting old friends of my parents in Vancouver it was time to load our luggage on the CNR train for the somewhat tedious journey back East

my fanmily plus Gordon and Irene Dowty behind the luggage cart.
"I chose the later dinner seating so that I didn't miss the views of Mount Robson, the Rockies' highest peak, from the dome car"

My view from the dome car
"Jasper - at the heart of the one of the Rockies' four major national parks - is, with the exception of the gorgeous Jasper Park Lodge, a plain little town. The surrounding wilderness is the attraction. As I disembarked four elk were grazing on the platform

CNR diesel 6782 at rest at Jasper station in July 1966.
Note no elk visible!! But can you smell the fresh mountain air!!!
"We were scheduled to arrive in Vancouver at 8am. That $23 fare bought the 1938 traveller a ticket to what has been called "the village at the edge of the rainforest".

Where the Rainforest Meets the Sea on Vancouver Island

A view on the way to the Daintree (rainforest World Heritage site's Discovery Cantre)
where the Daintree river flows into the Coral Sea on the Queensland shore (the famed GBR Great Barrier Reef is just over the horizon)

"and.. it was on its way to becoming Canada's "lotus land" - the dream destination of every cold, bored prairie dweller and every hard-up kid from the Maritimes."
Ron Jones take a bow!!

[ June 07, 2007, 14:15: Message edited by: johnfowles ]
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:48 PM   #8
johnfowles
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Quote:
Originally posted by charlene:
and fittingly in todays SUN is this article!
lol
http://www.torontosun.com/Travel/Can...65277-sun.html
Err Umm
I went there and was told to cough up or get lost
"The story you are searching for is available in its entirety via email, fax or mail for $12.00 (plus GST), payable with credit card (include expiry date)."
Well at least the Daily Telegraph is more magnanimous. (though to be fair no doubt if the disgraced former Canadian owner a certain Mr Black was still at the helm no doubt he would have seen that charging for the privelege of reading his newspaper could have enriched him even more!!
But access to even the Telegraph's archives is thankfully still completely free:-
For example from far off 2000:-
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/htmlConte...Fnemail18.html
a story that I can personally vouch for had a most satisfactory ending and has given me the happiest 7 years of my (lenghty) life
John Fowles Bt

[ June 07, 2007, 12:54: Message edited by: johnfowles ]
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:48 PM   #9
johnfowles
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Quote:
Originally posted by charlene:
and fittingly in todays SUN is this article!
lol
http://www.torontosun.com/Travel/Can...65277-sun.html
Err Umm
I went there and was told to cough up or get lost
"The story you are searching for is available in its entirety via email, fax or mail for $12.00 (plus GST), payable with credit card (include expiry date)."
Well at least the Daily Telegraph is more magnanimous. (though to be fair no doubt if the disgraced former Canadian owner a certain Mr Black was still at the helm no doubt he would have seen that charging for the privelege of reading his newspaper could have enriched him even more!!
But access to even the Telegraph's archives is thankfully still completely free:-
For example from far off 2000:-
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/htmlConte...Fnemail18.html
a story that I can personally vouch for had a most satisfactory ending and has given me the happiest 7 years of my (lenghty) life
John Fowles Bt

[ June 07, 2007, 12:54: Message edited by: johnfowles ]
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:52 PM   #10
charlene
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by johnfowles:
[QUOTE] (though to be fair no doubt if the disgraced former Canadian owner a certain Mr Black was still at the helm no doubt he would have seen that charging for the privelege of reading his newspaper could have enriched him even more!!
QUOTE]

that's "LORD" Black...lol
and he is no longer a Canuck..and yet to be found guilty of anything but being a pompous arse.
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Old 06-07-2007, 12:52 PM   #11
charlene
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by johnfowles:
[QUOTE] (though to be fair no doubt if the disgraced former Canadian owner a certain Mr Black was still at the helm no doubt he would have seen that charging for the privelege of reading his newspaper could have enriched him even more!!
QUOTE]

that's "LORD" Black...lol
and he is no longer a Canuck..and yet to be found guilty of anything but being a pompous arse.
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Old 06-07-2007, 01:00 PM   #12
johnfowles
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Quote:
Originally posted by charlene:

that's "LORD" Black...lol
and he is no longer a Canuck..and yet to be found guilty of anything but being a pompous arse.
touché CHer CHar
Jean
ami de B something
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Old 06-07-2007, 01:00 PM   #13
johnfowles
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Quote:
Originally posted by charlene:

that's "LORD" Black...lol
and he is no longer a Canuck..and yet to be found guilty of anything but being a pompous arse.
touché CHer CHar
Jean
ami de B something
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Old 06-07-2007, 01:52 PM   #14
byKimberly
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WOW!!! Wish I could go.
Kimberly
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Old 06-20-2007, 05:49 AM   #15
charlene
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a bit of a travelogue:
http://www.canada.com/topics/travel/...3c&k=20450&p=2
Wednesday » June 20 » 2007

Coast-to-coast by rail
With a rail pass, you can see it all this summer

Sofica Lukianenko
Citizen Special

PHOTO CREDIT: Peter Wilson/CanWest News Service
"All aboard!" yells a member of the VIA Rail team.

When a job contract comes to an end, what's the best thing to do with all the free time on your hands? In my case, travelling across Canada seemed like a good choice.

I had never seen either the west or east coast of this country, so I decided to combine both in one trip. I flew from Montreal to Vancouver and opted to travel eastwards by train, using Via Rail's Canrail Pass.

The pass lets you hop on and off the train at any stop. You're allowed 12 days of travel within a 30-day period.

As a bonus, travelling long distances by rail gives you the opportunity to read a novel or two, do some crossword puzzles or simply meet other passengers and make new friends.

"About 4,000 people purchase the pass each year," says Via Rail spokesperson Seychelle Harding, adding that it has been offered since 1991.

The pass allows you to show up at a train station at the last minute to see if a ticket is available for where you want to go. But Harding notes that summer is the busy season when some trains fill up, so travellers are advised to call ahead to book their tickets.

In Vancouver, I kicked off my month-long trip in mid-February by dipping my foot in English Bay, which I am told counts as the Pacific Ocean. While doing so, I noticed that ships pulling into the port tooted to the anthem of O Canada. A passerby commented, "it would make a great ring-tone for a cellphone."

A highlight of my visit to the city was a trip via water taxi to the Granville Island Brewery, which has been in operation since 1984. I toured the brewery and sampled four delicious ales. But to my dismay, the local beer has very limited exports outside B.C., so I had to drink up! Brewmaster Vern Lambourne claims "it's because the beer is so popular in B.C. that we can barely keep up."

From Vancouver I took the overnight train to Jasper where I skied at Marmot Basin. Then, after a brief stopover in Edmonton, I continued to Watrous, Sask.

There is no rail station in this town of 2,000 residents -- the train stops at the outskirts of Watrous beside the main road leading to the beach. And in my case, that happened at the rather inconvenient time of 3 a.m. With no taxi stand in sight, I hauled my gear for over an hour on tranquil Main Street to my destination: the Manitou Springs spa, located on Lake Manitou -- also known as "North America's Dead Sea."

Just about anyone who stays here agrees it's a surreal experience. Due to a high content of salt and minerals, it's impossible to sink in the brown water. I felt like I was either being pickled or marinated.

The resort is known for its healing properties, and "the mineral water helps relieve arthritis and rheumatism," claims Anita Swientach, a spa esthetician at Manitou Springs.

It was nice to be pampered, but after two days it was time to move on.

Winnipeg was the halfway point of my trip. I met up with old pals and saw a giant Lego exhibit at the children's museum in the Forks. With the help of spunky tykes, I interlocked the colourful plastic blocks in the shape of sea creatures at the "Ocean Adventure" exhibit. Six-year-old Andrij Deneka enjoyed building a hammerhead shark at a nearby table, saying "the big Lego submarine was cool -- you could actually go inside."

Toronto, a place I called home for several years before moving to Montreal, was a stop to get reacquainted with friends and former co-workers.

Kensington Market is always a "must-stop" for its scrumptious stinky cheeses and vintage clothing. It's like a treasure hunt digging through colourful beads and getting decked out in retro gowns.

Then on to la belle province, where I stopped at Quebec City to visit the nearby Ice Hotel built entirely of ice and snow. I ran in and out of every room and tried out all the beds just like Goldilocks, but was not brave enough to spend the night.

I continued towards the Gaspe region. From the train station at Perce, I took a shuttle towards my motel. Out of nowhere, the famed pierced landmark dubbed "Le Rocher Perce" appeared as if slapping me in the face.

The beach's rust-coloured shore is covered by a blanket of pebbles and stones, where I created a little Zen rock garden.

After taking in the sights of "La Gaspesie," it was time to explore my final destination, Halifax.

As soon as I arrived in the city I felt as if I had accomplished a major mission: I had just travelled more than 6,000 kilometres from one end of the country to the other.

At this point, I was determined to find the Atlantic Ocean and seal the deal. So I marched along the sloping streets toward Point Pleasant Park, which gives public access to the ocean. Once I reached the shore, I plunged my bare foot into the frigid water.

A celebratory lobster dinner ensued at Salty's restaurant, which has a great view of the waterfront.

Then, it was off to visit Alexander Keith's Brewery, a great place to meet people and listen to their travel adventures over a pint of beer.

If You Go...

Canrail pass: Costs $837 (less for children, students and seniors) from June 1 to Oct. 15. It allows 12 days of travel within a 30-day period anywhere in Canada. Travelling in the off-season is cheaper and less crowded (the pass costs $523 from Oct. 16 to May 31). You can buy a Canrail pass at Via's website or at any train station. Meals are extra.

More : www.viarail.ca/planner

© The Ottawa Citizen 2007
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Old 06-20-2007, 05:49 AM   #16
charlene
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a bit of a travelogue:
http://www.canada.com/topics/travel/...3c&k=20450&p=2
Wednesday » June 20 » 2007

Coast-to-coast by rail
With a rail pass, you can see it all this summer

Sofica Lukianenko
Citizen Special

PHOTO CREDIT: Peter Wilson/CanWest News Service
"All aboard!" yells a member of the VIA Rail team.

When a job contract comes to an end, what's the best thing to do with all the free time on your hands? In my case, travelling across Canada seemed like a good choice.

I had never seen either the west or east coast of this country, so I decided to combine both in one trip. I flew from Montreal to Vancouver and opted to travel eastwards by train, using Via Rail's Canrail Pass.

The pass lets you hop on and off the train at any stop. You're allowed 12 days of travel within a 30-day period.

As a bonus, travelling long distances by rail gives you the opportunity to read a novel or two, do some crossword puzzles or simply meet other passengers and make new friends.

"About 4,000 people purchase the pass each year," says Via Rail spokesperson Seychelle Harding, adding that it has been offered since 1991.

The pass allows you to show up at a train station at the last minute to see if a ticket is available for where you want to go. But Harding notes that summer is the busy season when some trains fill up, so travellers are advised to call ahead to book their tickets.

In Vancouver, I kicked off my month-long trip in mid-February by dipping my foot in English Bay, which I am told counts as the Pacific Ocean. While doing so, I noticed that ships pulling into the port tooted to the anthem of O Canada. A passerby commented, "it would make a great ring-tone for a cellphone."

A highlight of my visit to the city was a trip via water taxi to the Granville Island Brewery, which has been in operation since 1984. I toured the brewery and sampled four delicious ales. But to my dismay, the local beer has very limited exports outside B.C., so I had to drink up! Brewmaster Vern Lambourne claims "it's because the beer is so popular in B.C. that we can barely keep up."

From Vancouver I took the overnight train to Jasper where I skied at Marmot Basin. Then, after a brief stopover in Edmonton, I continued to Watrous, Sask.

There is no rail station in this town of 2,000 residents -- the train stops at the outskirts of Watrous beside the main road leading to the beach. And in my case, that happened at the rather inconvenient time of 3 a.m. With no taxi stand in sight, I hauled my gear for over an hour on tranquil Main Street to my destination: the Manitou Springs spa, located on Lake Manitou -- also known as "North America's Dead Sea."

Just about anyone who stays here agrees it's a surreal experience. Due to a high content of salt and minerals, it's impossible to sink in the brown water. I felt like I was either being pickled or marinated.

The resort is known for its healing properties, and "the mineral water helps relieve arthritis and rheumatism," claims Anita Swientach, a spa esthetician at Manitou Springs.

It was nice to be pampered, but after two days it was time to move on.

Winnipeg was the halfway point of my trip. I met up with old pals and saw a giant Lego exhibit at the children's museum in the Forks. With the help of spunky tykes, I interlocked the colourful plastic blocks in the shape of sea creatures at the "Ocean Adventure" exhibit. Six-year-old Andrij Deneka enjoyed building a hammerhead shark at a nearby table, saying "the big Lego submarine was cool -- you could actually go inside."

Toronto, a place I called home for several years before moving to Montreal, was a stop to get reacquainted with friends and former co-workers.

Kensington Market is always a "must-stop" for its scrumptious stinky cheeses and vintage clothing. It's like a treasure hunt digging through colourful beads and getting decked out in retro gowns.

Then on to la belle province, where I stopped at Quebec City to visit the nearby Ice Hotel built entirely of ice and snow. I ran in and out of every room and tried out all the beds just like Goldilocks, but was not brave enough to spend the night.

I continued towards the Gaspe region. From the train station at Perce, I took a shuttle towards my motel. Out of nowhere, the famed pierced landmark dubbed "Le Rocher Perce" appeared as if slapping me in the face.

The beach's rust-coloured shore is covered by a blanket of pebbles and stones, where I created a little Zen rock garden.

After taking in the sights of "La Gaspesie," it was time to explore my final destination, Halifax.

As soon as I arrived in the city I felt as if I had accomplished a major mission: I had just travelled more than 6,000 kilometres from one end of the country to the other.

At this point, I was determined to find the Atlantic Ocean and seal the deal. So I marched along the sloping streets toward Point Pleasant Park, which gives public access to the ocean. Once I reached the shore, I plunged my bare foot into the frigid water.

A celebratory lobster dinner ensued at Salty's restaurant, which has a great view of the waterfront.

Then, it was off to visit Alexander Keith's Brewery, a great place to meet people and listen to their travel adventures over a pint of beer.

If You Go...

Canrail pass: Costs $837 (less for children, students and seniors) from June 1 to Oct. 15. It allows 12 days of travel within a 30-day period anywhere in Canada. Travelling in the off-season is cheaper and less crowded (the pass costs $523 from Oct. 16 to May 31). You can buy a Canrail pass at Via's website or at any train station. Meals are extra.

More : www.viarail.ca/planner

© The Ottawa Citizen 2007
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Old 06-20-2007, 06:25 AM   #17
Paul Farnham
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I think that shot in the Dominion parking lot was taken in the Windsor area. You can't see Detroit from London.
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Old 06-20-2007, 07:02 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by Paul Farnham:
I think that shot in the Dominion parking lot was taken in the Windsor area. You can't see Detroit from London.
I think you're right..while it may be true that "on a clear day you can see forever" .. you still can't see Detroit from London..
and you can't see many Dominion Stores anymore either..if any, anywhere!
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Old 06-20-2007, 07:02 AM   #19
charlene
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Quote:
Originally posted by Paul Farnham:
I think that shot in the Dominion parking lot was taken in the Windsor area. You can't see Detroit from London.
I think you're right..while it may be true that "on a clear day you can see forever" .. you still can't see Detroit from London..
and you can't see many Dominion Stores anymore either..if any, anywhere!
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Old 06-20-2007, 07:23 AM   #20
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Thanks for confirming my suspicion, Char! BTW are you aware (you probably are) that when you stand on the banks of the Detroit River in downtown Windsor and gaze across you're looking due NORTH into the U.S.
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Old 06-20-2007, 07:36 AM   #21
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LOL! good thing Paul Gross didn't have the TV show DUE SOUTH placed in Detroit!
lol
and Cathy who lives in Northern Maine is about 500 miles north of Toronto...running pretty much as far north as Timmins is..
lol
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Old 06-20-2007, 07:36 AM   #22
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LOL! good thing Paul Gross didn't have the TV show DUE SOUTH placed in Detroit!
lol
and Cathy who lives in Northern Maine is about 500 miles north of Toronto...running pretty much as far north as Timmins is..
lol
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