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Old 02-25-2011, 08:13 AM   #101
Tim
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Default Re: Terry

Quote:
Originally Posted by charlene View Post
D.Rosati pic;
I agree with Jenney. Char, thank you so much for posting it. It goes beyond words.
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Old 02-26-2011, 09:53 PM   #102
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Default Re: Terry

Toronto Sun - Letters to Editor
today's paper.
http://www.torontosun.com/comment/le.../17411581.html
Terry’s guitar silenced

What? No mention of the Feb. 20 death of guitarist Terry Clements? For more than 40 years Terry was one of the essential sounds that made Gordon Lightfoot sound like Gordon Lightfoot. Clements was a huge talent who learned the ultimate skill — playing so artfully that he stayed in the background and let the star shine through. Any of us who play understand the huge talent Terry was. C’mon. You’re T.O. Give him a proper send off. Gord and the other members of the band must be devastated. Lightfoot is Canada to many people around the world. To music fans it isn’t just Gord, it’s also the band — Rick Haynes, Terry, Red Shea (another loss), Pee Wee Charles, Barry Keane and Mike Heffernan. RIP, Terry Clements. And thanks for all the music.

Ed Mullen

There has been nothing in the papers/tv etc. here other than online on CBC and CTV yesterday. I guess if the family/EMP don't put anything out there to publish then it's not something the press can write about it.
While this is personally sad news to us here on the WWW it's not anywhere else. There are 5 million people in the GTA (Great Toronto Area) and almost 50% or even a bit more of that poulation are immigrants who probably know nothing of Lightfoot or his band. Many others in the population, of all ages don't either. That's the reality of it.
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Old 02-26-2011, 09:58 PM   #103
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That's the reality of it.
I think it's a part of the price of growing older.
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Old 02-26-2011, 10:11 PM   #104
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that's for sure Ron...
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Old 02-26-2011, 11:06 PM   #105
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At least they printed the Letter to the Editor. But, I'm sure we all agree that is not sufficient enough given the magnitude of the loss. But I know I am "preaching to the choir" on this.
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:02 AM   #106
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more memories @ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=135868
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Old 03-02-2011, 02:41 PM   #107
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Terry

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=66139231&
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:30 PM   #108
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Heartbreaking to here of Terry's passing. Will be missed greatly.
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Old 03-13-2011, 11:18 PM   #109
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Default My fishing buddy, Terry Clements

I was extremely disheartened to learn of Terry's passing.
My heart goes out to Roz, his Son and his two Daughters, Gord and his Bandmates.

In the past ten days, many of my thoughts have been of "Cousin Clem" and some of the times I had spent with him.

I wish to proffer a Terry story, or two (of many, many..):

While up at the old family cottage, on Lake Simcoe, in the 70's and 80's, Terry and his Son and I often fished together (both on the ice and from my boat) and we all shared most enjoyable times together.

On one occasion, in the early 80's on a beautiful summers' day, in the late afternoon, Terry said he had to check in with Roz. So, from the kitchen of the cottage, he phoned in.

He came outside with a very long face.

He had just learned that his mother had passed, under tragic circumstances.

Suprisingly, I thought TC would immeditely wish to return to Aurora, where he lived, at the time. But he said: "Let's go out and fish some more. There is nothing I can do about this, now. I want to think." We went back out, ostensibly, to see if we could take a Walleye or two. Needless to say, for the next three or four hours, we did not talk that much, but he was emphatic about being out on the water. The lake was unusally calm and we were about 3 miles out, abeam the Big Bay Point Marina, on Long Shoal. It was a gorgeous late afternoon, which sequed into a beautiful sunset, whith every imaginable pastel colour of the rainbow in display. We even witnessed an exceptional and rare green flash, as the sun dipped below the horizon. I don't recall if we caught any fish, that early evening- or even if either of us got a bite. Terry was obviously deep in thought and I did my best not to impose upon his shock and grief.

Even in his grief, he still managed to shatter the silence and crack a few of his jokes- albeit half-heartedly, between puffs on his omnipresent big cigar.
After dark, when we returned to the cottage, he thanked me for providing him with a fine place to think, before he went to "deal with this".

I saw TC as a very private, deep-feeling person, who it was my priveledge to know. He just happened to be one masterful musician, as well.

Another reminise:

Back in 1981, TC also gave me an introduction to Ed McGlincy, now deceased, who had made an outstanding dreadnought six-string guitar for him. (He made one for both Gord and Terry. Both of them played their McGlincy's, both on stage and in the studio, as their primary 6-string instrument, throughout the 80's and 90's.). Ed reportedly created only nine guitars in his career as a Luthier. Three very lucky Canadians, myself included, are in possession of such a masterwork.
I was fortunate- make that blessed- that he had crated one for me. Mine, reputedly, was the most ornate and lavish one, he had ever made.
As a collector of many stringed instruments (I have owned as many as 20, at any one time), I consider my McGlincy to be my finest. It sounds better than my Martin D-50 (which I have sold.)

As recently as June, of last year, in Elmira, NY, Terry negotiated with me to trade his Country Genetleman, his on-stage Martin AND his old (albeit road-beat-up) McGlincy, for mine. I told him I would seriously consider the offer.

I last spoke with TC when he called me at home, in the autumn, before a concert in Troy(Albany), NY (I now live in upstate NY). He had invited me to drive up and come see him, after the gig (and, oh- bring your McGlincy, too!). I aplogized that I had a firm, prior commitment and I would be certain to meet with him when Gord next toured, in the spring of 2011.

I am now eternally sorry that I had missed this opportunity to see him, one final time...

Whenever I look at the McGlincy, I will forever think of that sweet, wonderful man: Terry Clements
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Old 03-13-2011, 11:52 PM   #110
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Default Re: My fishing buddy, Terry Clements

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex View Post
I was extremely disheartened to learn of Terry's passing.
My heart goes out to Roz, his Son and his two Daughters, Gord and his Bandmates.

In the past ten days, many of my thoughts have been of "Cousin Clem" and some of the times I had spent with him.

I wish to proffer a Terry story, or two (of many, many..):

While up at the old family cottage, on Lake Simcoe, in the 70's and 80's, Terry and his Son and I often fished together (both on the ice and from my boat) and we all shared most enjoyable times together.

On one occasion, in the early 80's on a beautiful summers' day, in the late afternoon, Terry said he had to check in with Roz. So, from the kitchen of the cottage, he phoned in.

He came outside with a very long face.

He had just learned that his mother had passed, under tragic circumstances.

Suprisingly, I thought TC would immeditely wish to return to Aurora, where he lived, at the time. But he said: "Let's go out and fish some more. There is nothing I can do about this, now. I want to think." We went back out, ostensibly, to see if we could take a Walleye or two. Needless to say, for the next three or four hours, we did not talk that much, but he was emphatic about being out on the water. The lake was unusally calm and we were about 3 miles out, abeam the Big Bay Point Marina, on Long Shoal. It was a gorgeous late afternoon, which sequed into a beautiful sunset, whith every imaginable pastel colour of the rainbow in display. We even witnessed an exceptional and rare green flash, as the sun dipped below the horizon. I don't recall if we caught any fish, that early evening- or even if either of us got a bite. Terry was obviously deep in thought and I did my best not to impose upon his shock and grief.

Even in his grief, he still managed to shatter the silence and crack a few of his jokes- albeit half-heartedly, between puffs on his omnipresent big cigar.
After dark, when we returned to the cottage, he thanked me for providing him with a fine place to think, before he went to "deal with this".

I saw TC as a very private, deep-feeling person, who it was my priveledge to know. He just happened to be one masterful musician, as well.

Another reminise:

Back in 1981, TC also gave me an introduction to Ed McGlincy, now deceased, who had made an outstanding dreadnought six-string guitar for him. (He made one for both Gord and Terry. Both of them played their McGlincy's, both on stage and in the studio, as their primary 6-string instrument, throughout the 80's and 90's.). Ed reportedly created only nine guitars in his career as a Luthier. Three very lucky Canadians, myself included, are in possession of such a masterwork.
I was fortunate- make that blessed- that he had crated one for me. Mine, reputedly, was the most ornate and lavish one, he had ever made.
As a collector of many stringed instruments (I have owned as many as 20, at any one time), I consider my McGlincy to be my finest. It sounds better than my Martin D-50 (which I have sold.)

As recently as June, of last year, in Elmira, NY, Terry negotiated with me to trade his Country Genetleman, his on-stage Martin AND his old (albeit road-beat-up) McGlincy, for mine. I told him I would seriously consider the offer.

I last spoke with TC when he called me at home, in the autumn, before a concert in Troy(Albany), NY (I now live in upstate NY). He had invited me to drive up and come see him, after the gig (and, oh- bring your McGlincy, too!). I aplogized that I had a firm, prior commitment and I would be certain to meet with him when Gord next toured, in the spring of 2011.

I am now eternally sorry that I had missed this opportunity to see him, one final time...

Whenever I look at the McGlincy, I will forever think of that sweet, wonderful man: Terry Clements
Thank you for sharing beautiful memories. Don't feel too bad about missing Terry last year, you have many great times to remember....it is such a part of day to day life now - being too busy. Terry was a lucky man to have you as his friend.
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:29 AM   #111
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Default Re: Terry

That should read: " I thought TC would immeditely wish to return to Aurora, where he lived, at the time. But, suprisingly..."

It was cathartic for me to relate these memories.

I thank you for your kind words, brink-.

Later on, I'll tell y'all another: "Terry and his Steak".

Alex
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:03 AM   #112
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Default Re: Terry

Alex
thank you so much for sharing. Most of us only "knew" Terry from the beautiful music he made. It is nice to hear the human stories. Your beautiful memories make me smile. I am so sorry for your loss. Terry was lucky to have you there in his time of loss. I hope you have someone to lean on now.
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:46 AM   #113
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Default Re: Terry's Steak

One thing TC REALLY enjoyed was good food.

In fact, his taste could be termed as truly gastronomique.

He would sometimes rattlle-on about how to prepare all sorts of foods, from fish to fowl, for hours, it seemed. He would also recommend me to visit his favorite butchers, in the York Region, north of Toronto...Some fine advice,there. He didn't steer you wrong.

One item he loved was a great steak. So did I, bit I never had the opportunities that he had to visit all the world-famous Steak Houses he did, in all his travels.

So, we would compare notes. I would tell him about all the usual places in Toronto...He would often counter with: "uh...well...it's ok, (lonnnng pause) but if you really want a good steak, try the Chop House, in Chicago, or a Kansas City Steakhouse...any Morton's is consistent, but pricey". One day, when I finally did get to Chicago, I tried the Chop House (on Ontario Street, of all places). He was right. The meat was fantastic. The guy knew great food.

I used to drop by with Smelt...lots of them...(these are fish about 5 inches long, which you catch with a big net, when they are on their annual three or four-day spawn, which typically happened anytime from late-April through early May.)Lots were fresh, caught only hours before. Some I smoked with applewood, hickory or alder. Tasty? Wow! TC and others appreciated this delicacy. TC used to compare them with Grunion, which he tried in California, when he had lived there. These Smelt were similar in size, but their meat was sweet clean, he claimed. High praise, from a connessieur of Tc's experience.

Being one who would always return a favour, Terry dropped by the cottage on afternoon to go catch some fish. He brought two big, beautiful steaks which he emphatically stated he would cook. He also produced a clear jar of his mystery sauce...the contents of which, he refused to reveal. He refused to even let me take off the lid and sniff it.

So, into the fridge these magnificantly-marbled steaks and glass jar, did go and we went out in my boat. Two hours later, we returned. No fish were caught or harmed. My throat was raw from laughing at some of the jokes and stories TC related. We were both hungry.

I lit the barbeque which was on top of the flat-topped cement boathouse (more like a fort, it was) and Terry took over. Over a Molson Stock Ale-or-two, we waited what seemed to be a very long time. Terry said: Its got to be hot. I mean, really hot. Be patient...After I while, I was ordered off the roof of the bothouse. He said "magic is gonna' happen".

After no more than five minutes, Terry came down the stairs with the two steaks: steaming and smelling wonderful.
We sat down on the picnic table and started to eat them. Incredible:never had I tasted a steak that good, except, perhaps, at the Chop House. He claimed it was a combination of intense heat, which sealed in the juice and his mystery sauce. No matter how hard-pressed, he refused to divulge the contents of this liquid.

About one-third of the way through our Steaks, the phone rang. I went inside the house to answer it. It was Roz, wanting to speak with Terry. I went to fetch him.

In the time it took for him to get inside the cottage, my usually-trusty hound of the time, a polite and well-mannered Manchester Terrier by the name of Tommy, grabbed both steaks from the picnic table. They were literally inhaled, with a speed not witnessed before... kibble or table scrap, hungry or snacking. And then, he bolted for parts unkown.

The meal was concluded with my garlic-potato casserole.

Tommy, knowing of what he had done, was not to be found. When he was found, hours later, I could swear he was grinning.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:43 AM   #114
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Default Re: Terry's McGlincy, A correction.

A correction: Ed McGlincy made a Dreadnought for Gord (see his on the cover of Dream Street Rose and Waiting For You (on the backcover)), then a modified 00 for Terry. Then, he made a Dreadnought for me. (It took him almost two years to complete mine. He completed the work in '83, if memory serves me.) If you look at the pictures posted on this site, you will clearly see them being played. If you have seen TC in concert, since 81', you have likely seen him play his McGlincy. I lent mine to TC, for a while, in the mid-80's. Terry played mine on stage. I am given to understand Gord has played mine. Look for the unique peaked headstock...This is Ed's "signature"...He also made one for Johnny Cash and one for Dylan, if I am not mistaken.
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Old 03-14-2011, 04:50 AM   #115
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Default Re: Terry, McGlincy Guitar,etc.

If you would like to hear some more nice Terry memories, or want to know more about McGlincy guitars, I'll post some more. Let me know!

If YOU have any pleasant TC anecdotes, please do share them with us, all.

Terry was a guy with an outstanding, wry sense of humour, best greeted with phrases uttered by the likes of the "French Taunter" (Go and boil your bottom, You son of a silly person! or: Your Mother Was A Hamster and your Father Smelt....of Elderberries! or" I blow my nose at you!, etc.) You were guaranteed to always be insulted back, in kind. Watch Monty Python and The Holy Grail...look for the two scenes with the French Taunter (John Cleese) trying to indimidate the Knights. You may just understand a bit about the late, great TC, if you do.

This greeting methodology was, far-and-away, the best way to exchange salutations with Mr. Clements.

The simple "hello" simply didn't cut it.
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Old 03-14-2011, 07:52 AM   #116
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HI ALex, thanks for sharing your Terry moments..sounds like an awful lot of fun to be around and a good friend to have.
He always made me smile when we spoke and he'd toss off one of his jokes.
We're all going to miss him.
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Old 03-14-2011, 09:37 AM   #117
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Default Re: Terry, McGlincy Guitar,etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex View Post
If you would like to hear some more nice Terry memories, or want to know more about McGlincy guitars, I'll post some more. Let me know!
yes please and thank you in advance, and as well for these past gems, lovely

may i ask what is/was the butcher in York Region? i spent my first 30 years growing up (ok, ok, that still hasn't happened) there, a tad south of Aurora...has that area ever changed

be well
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Old 03-14-2011, 04:19 PM   #118
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Default Re: Terry

OK, I shall share some more insights. Next up, is TC's favourite author. He was a subject matter expert on his works. Anyone hazard to take a guess?

Thanks for taking the trouble to share your feedback, people.

jj, The two butchers I liked the best: one was a "Mom and Pop" on Davis Drive, half-way toward Yonge Street. They closed in the late 80's (They tried moving into the new Mall, Upper Canada Square. It didn't work out, so they retired.). The other was a farmer, who lived just north of the Clements', on Bayview. His lamb and beef were magnificant. That farm has long since been developed. The Clements lived on the west side of a golf course, in Aurora, until the late 80's, when they moved up to Newmarket, just north of Davis Drive. The windows at the old place were always getting hit by golf balls. The activities of the Golfers kept the whole family "on their toes". That house is gone, too. The golf course may have been developed, by now. Status unkown.

I, myself, attended Pickering College, in Newmarket, from 70-74, as a boarder. When I first got to Newmarket, it was a sleepy little town of about 1,500 souls. The town ended where Main Street ended, on the north side and there was only little to the west (a few residences, little shopping), along Davis Drive. Yonge Street was nothing but farms. By the time I had left for University, in 74, the population had quadrupled. When I was a student, Pickering College had a huge, working farm, out back. By the mid-90's, what was once good farmland was now carpeted with housing, as far as the eye could see. The last time I had visited the area, around 2003, to call on Terry and other old friends, the area had become virtually unrecognizable to me- except for my alma mater and some other landmarks.

Yes, for better or worse, the character of the region has changed. No stopping "progress", I suppose.
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Old 03-14-2011, 07:07 PM   #119
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Default Re: Terry. a little Quid Pro Quo

I'll skip Terry's fav. author, for now, Dear Reader, and give you chance to guess who it was.

Instead, a little humour:

It was a lovely summers' morn, when my good friend, George and I headed from Toronto toward Peterborough, a mid-sized city in Ontario, just over 100 miles away to the east-north-east.

This was to be a good day. You could feel it in your bones.... a day of Carp Fishing at Little Lake- right in the heart of Peteborough, a dinner and a Lightfoot show. Good fishing, good food, good music and good company. What more else could anyone want?

The fishing was fantastic: 30 to 40 pound Carp- an ignored fish in Peterborough, it seemed-filled our coolers, by four o'clock, that afternoon. (Great tasting- IF you know the trick to preparing them.)

A fine dinner a local eatery. My dining companion made it a memorable experience.

Afterward, a short walk found us at the Peterborough Arena. We were lucky to get tickets. SRO! Gord and his band had not been here for years and the place was packed with an eager- almost rowdy, audience (It was a Hockey Arena. Almost no medium-to-large sized "proper" Music venues exist outside of Canadian big cities, but you could always find a Hockey Arena, even in the smallest of towns.). The concert was lively, the whole band was super-relaxed and in fine form. This was a fun gig...no stuffiness or snotty critics to impress, here.
The acoustics, as could be anticipated in a Hockey Arena- were lousy. Plain awful with long reverbarations. But, it seemed the audience didn't mind. The audience were even laughing loudly at the corniest of jokes.

Afterward, it was time for my friend and I to go backstage and say hello/deliver Pythonesque taunts, as applicable.

At the back of the Arena, the back door was guarded by a "Commisssioner" (a retired Military Veteran. Usually a nice old fellow, but serious, nonetheless.) Goerge and I were not on the backstage list as we just did the day, on a whim, much like Ferris Bueller would have. I knew that if I could catch the attention of one of the band members or Barry Harvey, we'd be in the door.
TC walked by and we shouted out. "Hey, get us past this guy!", or words, similar.
Terry smiled and said "Sure!" and pointed to my friend, George. Terry passed him a beer and gave him a big ole hug. Then, he pointed to me: "No, not him. I don't know him.". My "friends" walked away, barely containing their laughter until well out of view. I was most steamed at George, who had only met TC, a few times before- and, through my introduction. The door slamed in my face.
Stunned, I quickly recovered my composure and decided there was another way back there.
I was more than irritated. I marched back into the arena. Jumped onto the stage, where the roadies were as busy as bees. No one payed me mind. I just sauntered by like I owned the joint. (Kids: Don't try this technique in the post-911, paranoid, hyper-sensitive world. You will be rebuffed, kicked out- or worse.)
I entered the back-room to many guffaws and hyena-like chortles..."Good one, Clem! HardeeHar-Har!" and from me: "YOU - George!! You %$*^ traitor!" Even more laughter ensued. Oh, well. One beer later, another topic to discuss and all was forgotten. Or so, TC would believe...(nyuck,nyuck,nyuck).
I knew of Clem's prediliction for a nice,fat cigar, after a show. It was now the era where smoking was becomming verboten at most venues, backstages included.
So, out the door, went Terry. My friend and I made the rounds, kibbitzing an generally making merry.
About 15 minutes or so, Terry tried to get back in- the Commissioner didn't want to let him in. "But, I'm with the Band!" could be heard...The Commissioner opened the door and asked "Do you know this man?" I was purposefully positioned at the exact angle where I could see the backstage door. I responed: "Never seen him before." Clem protested "He's just pulling your leg. I am with the band." Just then, another member of the orchestra (who shall remain unnamed) walked by, saw the disruption. He looked at me, then at the commotion at the door and then back at me, right in my eyes. I trusted he would read my expression, correctly. He did. I asked this individual: "Do you know this guy?" He played it pertctly straight: "I don't know who he is. He can't come in here."
This was the only time I had every seen Terry angry. I'd seen him in every which mood, but never angry.
Another fifteen minutes passed and the room was starting to clear. Everyone was going home. Clems' two guitar cases were sitting in the corner. I asked George to watch them, as I went out to the stage to see where Clem was. The stage was empty and the road crew, gone. Terry was in a restrained discussion with one of Perborough's finest. A Cop. (i.e.; Not a Commisssioner.) I told the nice officer that the guy he was talking to really was with the band. I told him there was a little buffoonery going on. Everything copasetic. Terry grabbed his bag, I took an axe case and George, the other and we escorted TC to his car.
"Touche. You (&*(^ *(*(*). You know I'm gonna get you for that one, don't ya?"
Hearty laughs, all around.
The end of a fully perfect day.
Everyone should be lucky enough to have a few such days, in their lives.
You may ask yourself: Did TC ever even the score?
Yes, he did. But, that's another story.
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Old 03-14-2011, 09:54 PM   #120
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Default Re: Terry

Alex,

You're stories are quite colorful and entertaining. You recount them very well.

Thanks.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:31 PM   #121
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alex, i will venture a guess at the author. perhaps hemingway, as he was an avid fisherman?
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:46 PM   #122
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Default Re: Terry

Nice guess, but it was not Ernest Hemmingway.
TC was an occassional fisherman, but he looked liked a serious one with that multi-pocketed, beige vest, which he always wore, for what seemed like decades.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:48 AM   #123
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Default Re: Terry

Thanks for the stories, Alex. You have certainly lightened the mood around here. I am so glad you found our home.....great minds - and all that. I have found myself with a smile at the end our your stories. Well done. Author, hmmm perhaps Tom Clancy?
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Old 03-15-2011, 07:16 AM   #124
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Default Re: Terry and Clemens

Yes, you have read the tiltle correctly. And no "t" is missing.

I will no longer keep anyone in suspense. (Fine guess, jj...maybe he did read Hemingway. He never mentioned it to me, if he did.)

Terry's favorite author was Samuel Clemens, by a country mile.

Clem-O knew all his works and all the places associated with Mark Twain. He sometimes would quote Twain to those he thought might "get it".

I acquired only a passing familiarity with Twain, but I still enjoyed hearing TC talk about him.
My forte was Stephen Leacock, who oftimes left me laughing so hard that it hurt...It seems Mark Twain had a similar effect on Terry.
I was no expert on Leacock. I just enjoyed reading his books. However, it was clear Clements was an expert on Clemens.

I first learned of Terry's appreciation of Twain, in 1979.

Being a Commercial Pilot, I managed to get around, but nowhere to the distant and varied places Gord and his band of merry men visited.
I did "bush flying". I often got stuck in many a boring and uninspiring 'burgh- especially if the Weather Gods were somewhat displeased with me. Alas, I managed to make the best of it, only if I found a purveyor of used, musty and smelly old books. I love those places! (The big-city, high-rent phrase? Antiquarian Bookstore.)

I always kept a lookout for anything on subjects my friends fancied. Occasionaly, I would discover a true gem. The book would often be underappreciated and the seller sometimes just did not know what they had.

I was constantly bird-dogging, in my off hours:
for my girlfriend, of the time (later to become my wife...still is, too): anything on Picasso, for one Buddy: Fishing lore, for another: everything by Grey Owl, for my Mother: Medical reading, for Clements: Twain, for myself: Leacock.

Much of my flying was done out of Timmins, in Northern Ontario, to: as far north as the Cree Indian villages on the Albany River, as far South as the Nickel Belt, as far west, as Wawa and as far east to the huge James Bay power project, in Quebec. In time, I managed to corner the market on all the 1st Edition Leacocks, north of the Severn River. A few of these had even been signed by the great humourist, himself!

From time to time, I would come across other incredible, less frequent finds: 1st Edition Mark Twains. The ones I had discovered were in such places as Sudbury, North Bay, and other smaller, assorted One-Moose Towns, dotting the monotonous and never-ending boreal forest (Towns with only one airstrip- typically unpaved and too short for comfort. More than one time, did I have to abort a landing approach because of a Moose wandering on to the runway).
But, I digress.
These Twain beauties from the 1890's were ridiculously underpriced, compared to what they would go for in the States, IF you could ever find them. (I know this from experience. Whenever I passed through New England towns, I'd visit bookstores. If/When I did find them, first edition Mark Twains were very dear. Leacocks, as well. I can't tell whether New Englanders are better read than Ontarians, but I can vouch for the fact that they know the value of a well-written book.) These Twains, too, were to disappear from the shelves of the used booksellers of North Ontario.

I would pass the Twain finds over to Clem, with my compliments. I know these books now had a worthy custodian. I was told he would disappear to read them, until they were completely devoured.

I recall Terry saying, on more than a single occasion: "People get the impression that road musicians are as dumb as posts. Maybe some are, I don't know, but every one I've known has interests hardly anyone knows about and they're truly into them. And deeply, too. You just have to talk to them and listen to what they're saying."

I'd wager Terry could quote & argue Clemens as well as any PhD who did their dissertation on the man.

In an earlier story, I mentioned I had met Terry in Elmira, in June of 2010.
I knew Elmira held a very special place in his heart. He often talked about it. It was once the home and now is the final resting place of Mark Twain. Terry very much liked the "feel" of the place. An hour-or-so before the gig, we spent about thirty minutes talking about: old times, his kids- now, all adults (he especially beamed about a daughter), how he hadn't been to Elmira in about twenty years- what had changed and what hadn't, things which were vexing him, my McGlincy Guitar, his guitars, a subsequent negotiation for mine and ripping yarns from the complaints department, in general. He also asked me what I was up to and I told him what 'fer.
Just as he was being called to head backstage, he asked if I was going to the hotel. This was an affirmative, as my wife and i were staying overnight there, as well. We agreed to meet at the hotel bar.

After the concert, we attended at the appointed place for some libations. There, we were unexpectedly greeted by Rick Haynes and Mike Heffernan.
I got into a protracted conversation with Rick. Later on, Terry suddenly appeared and he began to discuss Twain with my wife. After a few minutes of Twainisms, he turned to me and he said "Hey, Alex, stick around. I've got something you'll want to see!" and he left.
Shortly thereafter, I left the bar to use the facilities and I ran into Terry out in the foyer.
He had a old-looking book with him. He handed me the book and told me to check it out.
I did so. There, on the initial leaf, was an inscription to him. It was dated: "March, 1981".
It was one of the 1st Edition finds which I had given him.
He thanked me for the book, one more time, over a quarter of a century later.

That was the last time I saw Terry Clements.

He never forgot a kindness, a truth to which many others will readily attest.

This type of person is classified as: Gentleman.
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Old 03-15-2011, 08:49 AM   #125
charlene
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Default Re: Terry

Thanks for the lovely story! I too love Stephen Leacock, his wit and humour are much like Twain/Clemens. And like Terry's.
I can imagine all the town you were in up north..I spent many summers in my parents hometown of Timmins and out in the bush where the cabin was located on Gibson Lake. Small bushplanes and float planes played a huge part in the lives of people in the remote areas you speak of...I've been to many of those little, out of the way towns.
It's nice but not surprising that Terry was such a thoughtful man and appreciative of the kindness you showed him. I'm sure those books were helpful in getting through the long flights and weeks away away from home and family while out on tour.
thanks again for the stories..
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