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Old 01-28-2006, 11:13 AM   #1
Auburn Annie
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Shakin' All Over Revisits Canadian Music From The '60s
Friday January 27, 2006 @ 07:30 PM
By: ChartAttack.com Staff


Nicholas Jennings

Canada's music scene is probably the hottest it's ever been right now, but today's stars owe a large debt to their predecessors who helped create a viable Canadian music industry and make this country the hotbed for talent that it's become. Shakin' All Over, a two-hour CBC-TV special airing at 8 p.m. on January 30, shines the spotlight on many of these pioneers.

The show is based on Nicholas Jennings' excellent 1998 book, Before The Gold Rush: Flashbacks To The Dawn Of The Canadian Sound, which chronicled the country's '60s musical revolution. Narrator Jian Ghomeshi and Jennings, who conducted more than 60 interviews across North America for the special, introduce you to a number of bands and artists who remain well-known today, as well as several you've probably never heard of unless you're a major Canadian music history junkie.

"Not many of these shows get made, and there's a good reason," says Jennings of the three years he put into the project. "They're so time-consuming and labour-intensive. To get as many artists and as many songs as we got into the show was a huge amount of work."

In addition to the usual suspects you'd expect to find, like The Guess Who, Leonard Cohen, Neil Young and Joni Mitchell, Shakin' All Over pays as much attention to relative unknowns like Vancouver's The Seeds Of Time, Ottawa's The Esquires and Montreal's Les Sultans.

"There was a mini scene in every major city that supported a healthy roster of bands," explains Jennings. "When you look closely at those artists, they were as much a part of the scene as the big icons.

"For every Randy Bachman or Gordon Lightfoot, there were all these other artists that they listened to and respected. We were able to make it like a love-in, where all the musicians talked about each other and what great songs their colleagues wrote."

Jennings also spoke to a variety of current musicians — including Sarah Harmer, Matthew Good, Hawksley Workman, 54.40's Neil Osborne, Barenaked Ladies' Steven Page, Sarah Slean and Sloan's Jay Ferguson — to get their perspectives on their musical forefathers.

"If you listen to records by The Ugly Ducklings or The Great Scots, they could almost be a hit in this day, because it's so contemporary with the revival of that sound by The White Stripes and The Hives," says Ferguson.

The special is brimming with rarely seen archival TV footage from Canada and the U.S., while some classic songs are given new life by modern artists to help bring things full circle.

If you miss the show on TV, Jennings says that EMI Canada plans to release it on DVD along with at least one companion CD highlighting some of the memorable music to emerge from the early days of Canadian rock.

"Canadian songs of the '60s stand the test of time," he insists. "Canada has always had the strength of songcraft."

—Steve McLean
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Old 01-28-2006, 11:13 AM   #2
Auburn Annie
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Shakin' All Over Revisits Canadian Music From The '60s
Friday January 27, 2006 @ 07:30 PM
By: ChartAttack.com Staff


Nicholas Jennings

Canada's music scene is probably the hottest it's ever been right now, but today's stars owe a large debt to their predecessors who helped create a viable Canadian music industry and make this country the hotbed for talent that it's become. Shakin' All Over, a two-hour CBC-TV special airing at 8 p.m. on January 30, shines the spotlight on many of these pioneers.

The show is based on Nicholas Jennings' excellent 1998 book, Before The Gold Rush: Flashbacks To The Dawn Of The Canadian Sound, which chronicled the country's '60s musical revolution. Narrator Jian Ghomeshi and Jennings, who conducted more than 60 interviews across North America for the special, introduce you to a number of bands and artists who remain well-known today, as well as several you've probably never heard of unless you're a major Canadian music history junkie.

"Not many of these shows get made, and there's a good reason," says Jennings of the three years he put into the project. "They're so time-consuming and labour-intensive. To get as many artists and as many songs as we got into the show was a huge amount of work."

In addition to the usual suspects you'd expect to find, like The Guess Who, Leonard Cohen, Neil Young and Joni Mitchell, Shakin' All Over pays as much attention to relative unknowns like Vancouver's The Seeds Of Time, Ottawa's The Esquires and Montreal's Les Sultans.

"There was a mini scene in every major city that supported a healthy roster of bands," explains Jennings. "When you look closely at those artists, they were as much a part of the scene as the big icons.

"For every Randy Bachman or Gordon Lightfoot, there were all these other artists that they listened to and respected. We were able to make it like a love-in, where all the musicians talked about each other and what great songs their colleagues wrote."

Jennings also spoke to a variety of current musicians — including Sarah Harmer, Matthew Good, Hawksley Workman, 54.40's Neil Osborne, Barenaked Ladies' Steven Page, Sarah Slean and Sloan's Jay Ferguson — to get their perspectives on their musical forefathers.

"If you listen to records by The Ugly Ducklings or The Great Scots, they could almost be a hit in this day, because it's so contemporary with the revival of that sound by The White Stripes and The Hives," says Ferguson.

The special is brimming with rarely seen archival TV footage from Canada and the U.S., while some classic songs are given new life by modern artists to help bring things full circle.

If you miss the show on TV, Jennings says that EMI Canada plans to release it on DVD along with at least one companion CD highlighting some of the memorable music to emerge from the early days of Canadian rock.

"Canadian songs of the '60s stand the test of time," he insists. "Canada has always had the strength of songcraft."

—Steve McLean
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Old 01-28-2006, 12:32 PM   #3
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Excellent! Thanks Annie. Ron Jones.
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Old 01-28-2006, 02:26 PM   #4
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Another article - more info:

Homegrown goldShakin' All Over flashes back to the day when Canada rocked the world
By ANDREW RYAN

Saturday, January 28, 2006 Page 6

This country took care of its own music scene back in the '60s and '70s, thanks very much. The British Invasion was fading and the U.S. was a mess, but the charts up here were cooking with hits by homegrown talents hailing from right across the country. We didn't need the Summer of Love and we hardly noticed Woodstock. American woman, get away from me. Up here in the Great White North we were happily grooving to that fine Canadian sound and eventually the whole world was listening right along.

If you were a Canadian kid back then, you were likely into the music scene and flag-waving proud of it. And we had every reason to be proud of artists like The Guess Who, or Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young, The Band and, yes, Anne Murray. They were music icons who rocked the world and they were ours.

Those good times come flooding back in Shakin' All Over, a remarkable time capsule of Canadian music's golden era. The documentary traces the timeline of Canadian musical brilliance from roughly the mid-'60s to the early '70s and along the way makes the striking creative connection to today's Canadian music stars. If you were a real fan of Canadian music, viewing the film might make you dizzier than the air at a Crowbar concert (and if you have to look up Crowbar, you're not a real fan).

Shakin' All Over is the best TV adaptation of a book in recent memory and certainly the coolest. Based on the book Gold Rush - Flashbacks to the Dawn of the Canadian Sound by Nicholas Jennings, the film pays very affectionate homage to the aforementioned Canadian legends, and a few dozen more, and quite a few of them show up to talk about those heady days.

All told, there are more than 60 interviews with Canadian artists in the two-hour film. There are memories from Lightfoot, Burton Cummings, Randy Bachman, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Sylvia of Ian and Sylvia and Steppenwolf's John Kay hands down the baddest-looking rock dude to ever come out of this country. There are interviews with the original band members of The Collectors, The Ugly Ducklings, Mashmakhan and at least a dozen other Canadian artists whose albums you may have in a milk crate stashed somewhere in your garage.

Those memories are deftly juxtaposed with commentary from current Canadian musical names, like Sarah Harmer, Hawksley Workman, Sarah Slean, Maestro and Sloan's Jay Ferguson, each offering personal acknowledgment of the era's unmistakable influence on their music. There are several update renditions of classic Canadian songs: Ron Sexsmith does proper justice to Lightfoot's If You Could Read My Mind; Diana Krall delivers a haunting version of Joni Mitchell's A Case of You. The musical lineage appears intact.

The interview segments provide proper context but are kept brief wherever possible to accommodate the astounding collection of archive film clips in Shakin' All Over.

The music was happening all over Canada in those days: If you lived in Vancouver, you were at the clubs on 4th Avenue. In Toronto, it was Yorkville at one point there were more than 40 clubs with live music or Yonge Street, where patrons lined up at Le Coq D'or to see Ronnie Hawkins parents at night and daytime matinees for the kids. The Canadian sound was rolling out across the land and thankfully there were very often cameras rolling and someone saw fit to store the footage.

Among the more outstanding musical moments in the program: Leonard Cohen performing Suzanne in a live outdoor concert, before a rapt crowd of hippies; Quebec superstar Robert Charlebois doing his angry-young-Frenchman thing in a TV special, with his Afro-hairstyle covering nearly half the screen; John Kay and Steppenwolf grinding out Magic Carpet Ride and Born to be Wild on what appears to be The Ed Sullivan Show; the infamous Crowbar concert where the band decided to bring out a stripper (while a dour-looking security guard glowers nearby); and a TV special performance of Heart of Gold by Neil Young that could break your heart.

In a lighter, or surreal, TV moment, there's a clip of the Canadian band Blood, Sweat and Tears appearing on the American top-of-the-pops program Hullabaloo, circa 1966. Singer David Clayton Thomas is on a miniature hockey rink set, adorned with NHL logos, while lovely models/go-go dancers, wearing hockey sweaters and brandishing hockey sticks, gently gyrate behind him. So that's how Americans used to think of us.

Shakin' All Over is best absorbed as an exhaustive tribute to those days, with appropriate time devoted to short profiles on Bruce Cockburn, The Band, Chilliwack, Murray McLauchlan and other towering musical luminaries who paved the way for today's artists. The program is an unabashed celebration of what was arguably the most fertile period in our musical history. It was a rare shared experience that captivated people from coast to coast. Even now, there's no way to explain or define the uniqueness of our Canadian sound. Like Woodstock, you simply had to be there.
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Old 01-28-2006, 02:26 PM   #5
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Another article - more info:

Homegrown goldShakin' All Over flashes back to the day when Canada rocked the world
By ANDREW RYAN

Saturday, January 28, 2006 Page 6

This country took care of its own music scene back in the '60s and '70s, thanks very much. The British Invasion was fading and the U.S. was a mess, but the charts up here were cooking with hits by homegrown talents hailing from right across the country. We didn't need the Summer of Love and we hardly noticed Woodstock. American woman, get away from me. Up here in the Great White North we were happily grooving to that fine Canadian sound and eventually the whole world was listening right along.

If you were a Canadian kid back then, you were likely into the music scene and flag-waving proud of it. And we had every reason to be proud of artists like The Guess Who, or Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young, The Band and, yes, Anne Murray. They were music icons who rocked the world and they were ours.

Those good times come flooding back in Shakin' All Over, a remarkable time capsule of Canadian music's golden era. The documentary traces the timeline of Canadian musical brilliance from roughly the mid-'60s to the early '70s and along the way makes the striking creative connection to today's Canadian music stars. If you were a real fan of Canadian music, viewing the film might make you dizzier than the air at a Crowbar concert (and if you have to look up Crowbar, you're not a real fan).

Shakin' All Over is the best TV adaptation of a book in recent memory and certainly the coolest. Based on the book Gold Rush - Flashbacks to the Dawn of the Canadian Sound by Nicholas Jennings, the film pays very affectionate homage to the aforementioned Canadian legends, and a few dozen more, and quite a few of them show up to talk about those heady days.

All told, there are more than 60 interviews with Canadian artists in the two-hour film. There are memories from Lightfoot, Burton Cummings, Randy Bachman, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Sylvia of Ian and Sylvia and Steppenwolf's John Kay hands down the baddest-looking rock dude to ever come out of this country. There are interviews with the original band members of The Collectors, The Ugly Ducklings, Mashmakhan and at least a dozen other Canadian artists whose albums you may have in a milk crate stashed somewhere in your garage.

Those memories are deftly juxtaposed with commentary from current Canadian musical names, like Sarah Harmer, Hawksley Workman, Sarah Slean, Maestro and Sloan's Jay Ferguson, each offering personal acknowledgment of the era's unmistakable influence on their music. There are several update renditions of classic Canadian songs: Ron Sexsmith does proper justice to Lightfoot's If You Could Read My Mind; Diana Krall delivers a haunting version of Joni Mitchell's A Case of You. The musical lineage appears intact.

The interview segments provide proper context but are kept brief wherever possible to accommodate the astounding collection of archive film clips in Shakin' All Over.

The music was happening all over Canada in those days: If you lived in Vancouver, you were at the clubs on 4th Avenue. In Toronto, it was Yorkville at one point there were more than 40 clubs with live music or Yonge Street, where patrons lined up at Le Coq D'or to see Ronnie Hawkins parents at night and daytime matinees for the kids. The Canadian sound was rolling out across the land and thankfully there were very often cameras rolling and someone saw fit to store the footage.

Among the more outstanding musical moments in the program: Leonard Cohen performing Suzanne in a live outdoor concert, before a rapt crowd of hippies; Quebec superstar Robert Charlebois doing his angry-young-Frenchman thing in a TV special, with his Afro-hairstyle covering nearly half the screen; John Kay and Steppenwolf grinding out Magic Carpet Ride and Born to be Wild on what appears to be The Ed Sullivan Show; the infamous Crowbar concert where the band decided to bring out a stripper (while a dour-looking security guard glowers nearby); and a TV special performance of Heart of Gold by Neil Young that could break your heart.

In a lighter, or surreal, TV moment, there's a clip of the Canadian band Blood, Sweat and Tears appearing on the American top-of-the-pops program Hullabaloo, circa 1966. Singer David Clayton Thomas is on a miniature hockey rink set, adorned with NHL logos, while lovely models/go-go dancers, wearing hockey sweaters and brandishing hockey sticks, gently gyrate behind him. So that's how Americans used to think of us.

Shakin' All Over is best absorbed as an exhaustive tribute to those days, with appropriate time devoted to short profiles on Bruce Cockburn, The Band, Chilliwack, Murray McLauchlan and other towering musical luminaries who paved the way for today's artists. The program is an unabashed celebration of what was arguably the most fertile period in our musical history. It was a rare shared experience that captivated people from coast to coast. Even now, there's no way to explain or define the uniqueness of our Canadian sound. Like Woodstock, you simply had to be there.
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Old 01-30-2006, 07:05 AM   #6
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Groovy, uninhibited Canadian rock
A CBC documentary digs out forgotten footage of this country's best musicians to reveal Canada at its coolest, writes GUY DIXON

By GUY DIXON

Monday, January 30, 2006 Page R2

It's the height of the 1960s. Tucked inside The New Penelope, a basement coffeehouse in Montreal, The Guess Who are watching a small-town Ontario singer perform a 60-minute set of his own songs. There are only 50 people in the audience, but Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman are envious and keep nudging each other, saying, "some day that'll be us."

Bear in mind, The Guess Who at this point is already a promising singles band, on the cusp of rising as high as most Canadian groups in the sixties could dream. But the figure performing has already hit something higher artistically. The singer is Gordon Lightfoot.

The two-hour special Shakin' All Over: Canadian Pop Music in the 1960s is filled with such pivotal moments and musical connections weaving together early Canadian rock and folk, from Buffy Sainte- Marie to Steppenwolf. Writer Nicholas Jennings and director Gary McGroarty have fulfilled every pop historian's dream by digging out forgotten footage and creating a beautifully concise, music-laden special airing tonight on CBC Television. It's the sixties Canadian rock scene at its groovy, uninhibited peak.

So much came out of what many must have considered back then to be utterly innocuous stuff, such as CBC's teen pop show Let's Go. The house band, when the show was taped in Vancouver, was The Classics, a fairly traditional R&B group. That band then blossomed into The Collectors, helping to establish Vancouver's 4th Avenue psychedelic scene and clubs such as The Afterthought and Retinal Circus. L.A. beckoned, and The Collectors became a success there too with a big billboard on Sunset Strip. By the end of the decade, the group reinvented itself yet again as Chilliwack, a staple of Vancouver rock in the 1970s.

But more than just rock genealogy or a nostalgic walk through Dad's LPs, the music represents not only the birth of the Canadian rock industry, but what it was to be young and alive in the 1960s -- if not today.

"[We] really didn't want to make this an oldies show," Jennings says. "We wanted to make it clear that these songs have a life. There's a legacy there which resonates with people no matter what age."

The little history of CBC's Let's Go had other historic offshoots: The house band for shows taped in Winnipeg was none other than The Guess Who. By the second season, the CBC producer of the show agreed to hear some of the band's own songs and, if he liked them, to let them play them on air. One was These Eyes, which went on to solidify The Guess Who's career and open the door a little wider for countless other Canadian bands.

Take The Staccatos. The Guess Who were asked by Coca-Cola to write and record half an album (sold for 10 bottle caps and $1, Bachman said), as part of a rock-oriented promotion. The Staccatos wrote the other half. That group later became the Five Man Electrical Band and penned the major 1971 hit Signs, an immediately recognizable song programmed into everyone's DNA, whether you recognize the title or not.

But none of this cross-nurturing compares to the exchange of ideas and band members in Toronto's Yorkville and Yonge Street scenes. The message in Opportunity, the headstrong hit by Mandala with the late guitar great Domenic Troiano, seems so prophetic now.

From Yonge Street and what was then called the Toronto Sound -- a mix of rock and soul (and small traces of reggae given the Jamaican influence in Toronto) -- came such powerhouse acts as Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks, which (minus Hawkins) became The Band, David Clayton Thomas, who went on to join Blood, Sweat and Tears, and Toronto's hugely popular, scream-inducing band Jon and Lee and The Checkmates, just to name a few.

From the coffeehouses of Yorkville came bands such as Neil Young's early group The Squires, The Sparrow, which would turn into Steppenwolf, and the high-voltage psychedelic group The Paupers opening for Jefferson Airplane and utterly stealing its spotlight. There was also the harmonic, Summer of Love-imbibed Kensington Market, managed by Bob Dylan's Albert Grossman. A clip of the band features the two legendary Toronto singers Keith McKie and Luke Gibson, performing the incredible Side I Am, a song that should top any best-of-the-sixties song list, if only it had been lucky enough to get more exposure.

But as some note in the documentary, it's the regional garage bands that had a sound which seems so utterly contemporary today. These were the groups that never got beyond the high-school dance circuit and small clubs despite their hard-edged sound, channelling the same blues as The Rolling Stones. Groups like: Vancouver's The Seeds of Time, Toronto's The Ugly Ducklings (said to have been Mick Jagger's favourite Canadian band), Halifax's kilt-wearing The Great Scots and especially Montreal's The Haunted.

With their single 1-2-5 playing as the soundtrack, the CBC filmed The Haunted in the mid-sixties for a "youth culture" documentary called The Restless Years. For sheer sixties iconography -- the horn-rimmed glasses and overgrown haircuts, the Beatle boots, the tamed R&B raunch -- the ultra-rare clip remains Canada at its coolest.

"It was really important to go beyond the usual Canadian icons," Jennings says, "and to put them in the context of all the other music that was coming out of Canada in the sixties. My urgency was to find that music and save it before it's lost to the mists of time."

Also appealing for its folk-rock air, op-art backdrops and Sassoon hairstyles is footage of Toronto's The Stormy Clovers performing Leonard Cohen's Suzanne. Both acts shared the same manager, Mary Martin (also credited with hooking The Band up with the newly electrified Bob Dylan). Even though some artists were recording his material, such as Judy Collins, The Stormy Clovers undoubtedly gave Cohen that extra push into what became his near mythical, late-blooming musical career.

Jennings says he's currently in talks with labels to reissue the songs featured in the documentary, which would be a godsend. There are also plans to make two other films, one running from the 1970s to the rise of music videos in the mid-1980s and another from the mid-1980s until the current explosion of Canadian indie bands.

In the meantime, if there was ever a CBC special to tape, Shakin' All Over is it. The footage is as valuable as the dimming memories of the long-disappeared Yorkville and 4th Avenue scenes, while the music only gets better and better over time.

Shakin' All Over airs at 8 tonight on CBC-TV.
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Old 01-30-2006, 07:05 AM   #7
Auburn Annie
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Groovy, uninhibited Canadian rock
A CBC documentary digs out forgotten footage of this country's best musicians to reveal Canada at its coolest, writes GUY DIXON

By GUY DIXON

Monday, January 30, 2006 Page R2

It's the height of the 1960s. Tucked inside The New Penelope, a basement coffeehouse in Montreal, The Guess Who are watching a small-town Ontario singer perform a 60-minute set of his own songs. There are only 50 people in the audience, but Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman are envious and keep nudging each other, saying, "some day that'll be us."

Bear in mind, The Guess Who at this point is already a promising singles band, on the cusp of rising as high as most Canadian groups in the sixties could dream. But the figure performing has already hit something higher artistically. The singer is Gordon Lightfoot.

The two-hour special Shakin' All Over: Canadian Pop Music in the 1960s is filled with such pivotal moments and musical connections weaving together early Canadian rock and folk, from Buffy Sainte- Marie to Steppenwolf. Writer Nicholas Jennings and director Gary McGroarty have fulfilled every pop historian's dream by digging out forgotten footage and creating a beautifully concise, music-laden special airing tonight on CBC Television. It's the sixties Canadian rock scene at its groovy, uninhibited peak.

So much came out of what many must have considered back then to be utterly innocuous stuff, such as CBC's teen pop show Let's Go. The house band, when the show was taped in Vancouver, was The Classics, a fairly traditional R&B group. That band then blossomed into The Collectors, helping to establish Vancouver's 4th Avenue psychedelic scene and clubs such as The Afterthought and Retinal Circus. L.A. beckoned, and The Collectors became a success there too with a big billboard on Sunset Strip. By the end of the decade, the group reinvented itself yet again as Chilliwack, a staple of Vancouver rock in the 1970s.

But more than just rock genealogy or a nostalgic walk through Dad's LPs, the music represents not only the birth of the Canadian rock industry, but what it was to be young and alive in the 1960s -- if not today.

"[We] really didn't want to make this an oldies show," Jennings says. "We wanted to make it clear that these songs have a life. There's a legacy there which resonates with people no matter what age."

The little history of CBC's Let's Go had other historic offshoots: The house band for shows taped in Winnipeg was none other than The Guess Who. By the second season, the CBC producer of the show agreed to hear some of the band's own songs and, if he liked them, to let them play them on air. One was These Eyes, which went on to solidify The Guess Who's career and open the door a little wider for countless other Canadian bands.

Take The Staccatos. The Guess Who were asked by Coca-Cola to write and record half an album (sold for 10 bottle caps and $1, Bachman said), as part of a rock-oriented promotion. The Staccatos wrote the other half. That group later became the Five Man Electrical Band and penned the major 1971 hit Signs, an immediately recognizable song programmed into everyone's DNA, whether you recognize the title or not.

But none of this cross-nurturing compares to the exchange of ideas and band members in Toronto's Yorkville and Yonge Street scenes. The message in Opportunity, the headstrong hit by Mandala with the late guitar great Domenic Troiano, seems so prophetic now.

From Yonge Street and what was then called the Toronto Sound -- a mix of rock and soul (and small traces of reggae given the Jamaican influence in Toronto) -- came such powerhouse acts as Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks, which (minus Hawkins) became The Band, David Clayton Thomas, who went on to join Blood, Sweat and Tears, and Toronto's hugely popular, scream-inducing band Jon and Lee and The Checkmates, just to name a few.

From the coffeehouses of Yorkville came bands such as Neil Young's early group The Squires, The Sparrow, which would turn into Steppenwolf, and the high-voltage psychedelic group The Paupers opening for Jefferson Airplane and utterly stealing its spotlight. There was also the harmonic, Summer of Love-imbibed Kensington Market, managed by Bob Dylan's Albert Grossman. A clip of the band features the two legendary Toronto singers Keith McKie and Luke Gibson, performing the incredible Side I Am, a song that should top any best-of-the-sixties song list, if only it had been lucky enough to get more exposure.

But as some note in the documentary, it's the regional garage bands that had a sound which seems so utterly contemporary today. These were the groups that never got beyond the high-school dance circuit and small clubs despite their hard-edged sound, channelling the same blues as The Rolling Stones. Groups like: Vancouver's The Seeds of Time, Toronto's The Ugly Ducklings (said to have been Mick Jagger's favourite Canadian band), Halifax's kilt-wearing The Great Scots and especially Montreal's The Haunted.

With their single 1-2-5 playing as the soundtrack, the CBC filmed The Haunted in the mid-sixties for a "youth culture" documentary called The Restless Years. For sheer sixties iconography -- the horn-rimmed glasses and overgrown haircuts, the Beatle boots, the tamed R&B raunch -- the ultra-rare clip remains Canada at its coolest.

"It was really important to go beyond the usual Canadian icons," Jennings says, "and to put them in the context of all the other music that was coming out of Canada in the sixties. My urgency was to find that music and save it before it's lost to the mists of time."

Also appealing for its folk-rock air, op-art backdrops and Sassoon hairstyles is footage of Toronto's The Stormy Clovers performing Leonard Cohen's Suzanne. Both acts shared the same manager, Mary Martin (also credited with hooking The Band up with the newly electrified Bob Dylan). Even though some artists were recording his material, such as Judy Collins, The Stormy Clovers undoubtedly gave Cohen that extra push into what became his near mythical, late-blooming musical career.

Jennings says he's currently in talks with labels to reissue the songs featured in the documentary, which would be a godsend. There are also plans to make two other films, one running from the 1970s to the rise of music videos in the mid-1980s and another from the mid-1980s until the current explosion of Canadian indie bands.

In the meantime, if there was ever a CBC special to tape, Shakin' All Over is it. The footage is as valuable as the dimming memories of the long-disappeared Yorkville and 4th Avenue scenes, while the music only gets better and better over time.

Shakin' All Over airs at 8 tonight on CBC-TV.
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Old 01-30-2006, 02:39 PM   #8
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And a DVD of "Shakin' All Over" will be released as well:

Lowdown: Cdn. music doc DVD/CD planned

By KAREN BLISS -- For JAM! Music


EMI Music Canada will release a DVD and companion CD based on "Shakin' All Over," the two-hour documentary about Canadian pop music in the '60s that airs tonight (Jan. 30) on CBC Television at 8 p.m. ET.

Sales will benefit the charity MusicCan, a national music education program implemented by the Canadian Academy Of Recording Arts & Sciences.

"It's going to have a life beyond the TV special," says noted Toronto music journalist Nicholas Jennings, who wrote the book "Before the Gold Rush -- Flashbacks To The Dawn Of The Canadian Sound" (Penguin Books), on which the film is based, and served as the writer and associate producer of "Shakin' All Over."

Details have yet to be worked out with EMI such as track listing and additional content, but Jennings says the DVD and CD should be out this year, "maybe the spring, maybe the summer."

Jennings, the former music critic for Maclean's magazine and current music editor for Inside Entertainment, conducted more than 60 interviews for the documentary and licensed as many songs.

He was also able to dig up such rare clips as David Clayton Thomas & The Shays on NBC's "Hullabaloo," Halifax garage band The Great Scots on "American Bandstand," Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young and Joni Mitchell in separate performances on BBC's "In Concert," Murray McLauchlan at the Riverboat club, Bruce Cockburn on CBC's "Rock II," and Steppenwolf on "The Ed Sullivan Show."

"There's tons more that we edited for the TV show," says Jennings. "Would EMI want the DVD to feature full performances? I guess it all comes down to budget."

Many of those finer points "Shakin' All Over" producer Pierre Touchette of Montreal-based Amerimage-Spectra will be working out with EMI, namely vice-president of marketing Rob Brooks and director of catalogue marketing Warren Stewart. Jennings expects to have input as well.

Jennings has an existing relationship with EMI Music Canada stemming back to the late '90s when label president Deane Cameron hired him to write the company's anniversary tome, "EMI Music Canada -- Fifty Years Of Music 1949 to 1999" (Macmillan Canada), which came out in 2000.

"Deane is a fan of 'Before The Gold Rush.' That's why he commissioned me to do the EMI history book, but beyond that, he also cares passionately about Canadian music history," says Jennings. "I really respect Deane because he has been a huge champion of Canadian music and heritage."

Both books are now out of print.

However, Jennings is hoping that "Before The Gold Rush," which came out in hard cover in 1997 and paperback in 1998, will get back into circulation. "A lot of people love the book and want it to be back in print. I was very lucky that it got into a lot of libraries before it went out of print. It's just a matter of do I find another publisher or do I publish it myself?" he says.

The idea for "Before The Gold Rush," -- initially titled "Yorkville Daze" which was deemed "too Toronto-centric" by Penguin, according to Jennings -- came to him in 1996 after he interviewed the five music veterans inducted into the Juno Awards' Canadian Music Hall Of Fame that year and found a common thread of Yorkville.

In separate interviews for his Maclean's magazine article, David Clayton-Thomas, Denny Doherty, John Kay, Domenic Troiano, Zal Yanovsky each brought up the Toronto district "as this looming presence" in their early careers.

Jennings had his own history with Yorkville, having worked part-time at the Riverboat club in the '70s while he was a journalism student at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, and witnessing show by the likes of Dan Hill, Colin Linden, Cockburn, Lightfoot, and McLauchlan.

He decided to write a book on the Yorkville and Yonge Street scenes before anyone else did.

"I tried convince my publisher, Penguin Books, back when the book was published that people would love a CD too, but Penguin couldn't envision it; they couldn't see a way to make that happen," says Jennings. "I tried to involve some record labels and some people in the industry were very excited about the idea, but it never came to fruition."

From the time the book was published in 1997, Jennings was approached by many film and television producers to turn the book into a documentary or even a series. "None of those approaches led to anything because none of those producers could get the financing or a broadcast commitment," Jennings says.

That changed in 2001 when he was approached by Touchette, who worked for the TV production side of Amerimage-Spectra. Among its many entertainment ventures, the company has recorded performances at the Montreal International Jazz Festival, and more recently produced DVDs such as "Diana Krall - Live at the Montreal Jazz Festival" and "Creating The Lord of the Rings Symphony."

"He optioned the book and hired me to write the documentary," says Jennings.

Joining Touchette were producers Nick Orchard and Randolph Eustace-Walden and executive producer Luc Chatelain. The project also became a co-production between Amerimage-Spectra and Vancouver's Soapbox Productions. And Gary McGroarty (2000's documentary "Stand Up And Be Counted") was brought in as the director.

"Gary completely shared my passion for getting as much Canadian music from the 60s on the screen," says Jennings.

Touchette got a broadcast commitment from CBC Television and he and McGroarty were given access to the broadcaster's massive archives.

Initially, Jennings says CBC wanted the film to focus on who he calls the "Mount Rushmore of Canadian music" -- Young, Mitchell, Lightfoot and Cohen.

"That's not really doing justice to the '60s and the wealth of music that this country produced, so we dug our heels in and started going into the archives," says Jennings. "There's not a lot of great material left from the '60s and most of what does exist resides in the CBC archives."

More than half the footage in "Shakin' All Over" is from the CBC.

With the mass of material they had assembled of Canadian music from the '60s, Jennings began talking with Ross Reynolds at CARAS, the organization that presents the Juno Awards, and with Graham Henderson of the Canadian Recordings Industry Association (CRIA) which represents the companies that create, manufacture and market sound recordings.

"CARAS was immediately interested because they are developing the Juno Hall Of Fame, and CARAS and CRIA both wanted to find a way to see this TV special made into a DVD," relays Jennings. "It's a challenge, of course, because the licensing of songs is incredibly expensive and this show has 60 of them, so CARAS wanted to play a role in this and it will wind up being a charitable project along the lines of a "Oh What A Feeling,'" he says, referring to the 1996 and 2001 box sets produced by CARAS to celebrate the 25th and 30th anniversary of the Juno Awards.

"The CARAS charity is (for) music in the schools which I'm very pleased about because I really see this documentary has a real educational role to play. It has that kind of value," says Jennings.

"Shakin' All Over" is the first of a planned three-part series Jennings is making with Touchette and McGroarty on the history of Canadian pop music, tentatively titled "Maple Music."

"The format that was used for 'Shakin' All Over' will carry the series through," says Jennings. "The next part will begin in the early '70s and bring us up to the birth of music television in the mid '80s and the third will be the mid '80s to present."

CBC has been offered the entire series.

Jennings is also developing two television performance specials on Canadian Celtic music acts Leahy and Natalie MacMaster. "Gary and I are the creative producers and Amerimage-Spectra will be the producer," he says.
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Old 01-30-2006, 02:39 PM   #9
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And a DVD of "Shakin' All Over" will be released as well:

Lowdown: Cdn. music doc DVD/CD planned

By KAREN BLISS -- For JAM! Music


EMI Music Canada will release a DVD and companion CD based on "Shakin' All Over," the two-hour documentary about Canadian pop music in the '60s that airs tonight (Jan. 30) on CBC Television at 8 p.m. ET.

Sales will benefit the charity MusicCan, a national music education program implemented by the Canadian Academy Of Recording Arts & Sciences.

"It's going to have a life beyond the TV special," says noted Toronto music journalist Nicholas Jennings, who wrote the book "Before the Gold Rush -- Flashbacks To The Dawn Of The Canadian Sound" (Penguin Books), on which the film is based, and served as the writer and associate producer of "Shakin' All Over."

Details have yet to be worked out with EMI such as track listing and additional content, but Jennings says the DVD and CD should be out this year, "maybe the spring, maybe the summer."

Jennings, the former music critic for Maclean's magazine and current music editor for Inside Entertainment, conducted more than 60 interviews for the documentary and licensed as many songs.

He was also able to dig up such rare clips as David Clayton Thomas & The Shays on NBC's "Hullabaloo," Halifax garage band The Great Scots on "American Bandstand," Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young and Joni Mitchell in separate performances on BBC's "In Concert," Murray McLauchlan at the Riverboat club, Bruce Cockburn on CBC's "Rock II," and Steppenwolf on "The Ed Sullivan Show."

"There's tons more that we edited for the TV show," says Jennings. "Would EMI want the DVD to feature full performances? I guess it all comes down to budget."

Many of those finer points "Shakin' All Over" producer Pierre Touchette of Montreal-based Amerimage-Spectra will be working out with EMI, namely vice-president of marketing Rob Brooks and director of catalogue marketing Warren Stewart. Jennings expects to have input as well.

Jennings has an existing relationship with EMI Music Canada stemming back to the late '90s when label president Deane Cameron hired him to write the company's anniversary tome, "EMI Music Canada -- Fifty Years Of Music 1949 to 1999" (Macmillan Canada), which came out in 2000.

"Deane is a fan of 'Before The Gold Rush.' That's why he commissioned me to do the EMI history book, but beyond that, he also cares passionately about Canadian music history," says Jennings. "I really respect Deane because he has been a huge champion of Canadian music and heritage."

Both books are now out of print.

However, Jennings is hoping that "Before The Gold Rush," which came out in hard cover in 1997 and paperback in 1998, will get back into circulation. "A lot of people love the book and want it to be back in print. I was very lucky that it got into a lot of libraries before it went out of print. It's just a matter of do I find another publisher or do I publish it myself?" he says.

The idea for "Before The Gold Rush," -- initially titled "Yorkville Daze" which was deemed "too Toronto-centric" by Penguin, according to Jennings -- came to him in 1996 after he interviewed the five music veterans inducted into the Juno Awards' Canadian Music Hall Of Fame that year and found a common thread of Yorkville.

In separate interviews for his Maclean's magazine article, David Clayton-Thomas, Denny Doherty, John Kay, Domenic Troiano, Zal Yanovsky each brought up the Toronto district "as this looming presence" in their early careers.

Jennings had his own history with Yorkville, having worked part-time at the Riverboat club in the '70s while he was a journalism student at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, and witnessing show by the likes of Dan Hill, Colin Linden, Cockburn, Lightfoot, and McLauchlan.

He decided to write a book on the Yorkville and Yonge Street scenes before anyone else did.

"I tried convince my publisher, Penguin Books, back when the book was published that people would love a CD too, but Penguin couldn't envision it; they couldn't see a way to make that happen," says Jennings. "I tried to involve some record labels and some people in the industry were very excited about the idea, but it never came to fruition."

From the time the book was published in 1997, Jennings was approached by many film and television producers to turn the book into a documentary or even a series. "None of those approaches led to anything because none of those producers could get the financing or a broadcast commitment," Jennings says.

That changed in 2001 when he was approached by Touchette, who worked for the TV production side of Amerimage-Spectra. Among its many entertainment ventures, the company has recorded performances at the Montreal International Jazz Festival, and more recently produced DVDs such as "Diana Krall - Live at the Montreal Jazz Festival" and "Creating The Lord of the Rings Symphony."

"He optioned the book and hired me to write the documentary," says Jennings.

Joining Touchette were producers Nick Orchard and Randolph Eustace-Walden and executive producer Luc Chatelain. The project also became a co-production between Amerimage-Spectra and Vancouver's Soapbox Productions. And Gary McGroarty (2000's documentary "Stand Up And Be Counted") was brought in as the director.

"Gary completely shared my passion for getting as much Canadian music from the 60s on the screen," says Jennings.

Touchette got a broadcast commitment from CBC Television and he and McGroarty were given access to the broadcaster's massive archives.

Initially, Jennings says CBC wanted the film to focus on who he calls the "Mount Rushmore of Canadian music" -- Young, Mitchell, Lightfoot and Cohen.

"That's not really doing justice to the '60s and the wealth of music that this country produced, so we dug our heels in and started going into the archives," says Jennings. "There's not a lot of great material left from the '60s and most of what does exist resides in the CBC archives."

More than half the footage in "Shakin' All Over" is from the CBC.

With the mass of material they had assembled of Canadian music from the '60s, Jennings began talking with Ross Reynolds at CARAS, the organization that presents the Juno Awards, and with Graham Henderson of the Canadian Recordings Industry Association (CRIA) which represents the companies that create, manufacture and market sound recordings.

"CARAS was immediately interested because they are developing the Juno Hall Of Fame, and CARAS and CRIA both wanted to find a way to see this TV special made into a DVD," relays Jennings. "It's a challenge, of course, because the licensing of songs is incredibly expensive and this show has 60 of them, so CARAS wanted to play a role in this and it will wind up being a charitable project along the lines of a "Oh What A Feeling,'" he says, referring to the 1996 and 2001 box sets produced by CARAS to celebrate the 25th and 30th anniversary of the Juno Awards.

"The CARAS charity is (for) music in the schools which I'm very pleased about because I really see this documentary has a real educational role to play. It has that kind of value," says Jennings.

"Shakin' All Over" is the first of a planned three-part series Jennings is making with Touchette and McGroarty on the history of Canadian pop music, tentatively titled "Maple Music."

"The format that was used for 'Shakin' All Over' will carry the series through," says Jennings. "The next part will begin in the early '70s and bring us up to the birth of music television in the mid '80s and the third will be the mid '80s to present."

CBC has been offered the entire series.

Jennings is also developing two television performance specials on Canadian Celtic music acts Leahy and Natalie MacMaster. "Gary and I are the creative producers and Amerimage-Spectra will be the producer," he says.
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Old 01-31-2006, 11:02 AM   #10
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Overall, a great show. A lot of familiar faces and some new ones which was interesting for someone like me, not having grown up in the 1960s.

I was a little disappointed with the content on Gord though. They gave him a segment of about 2 minutes, even though he was one of the most influential Canadian artists of the 1960s. I mean, think about the reaction "Black Day in July" got south of the border. Consider that "The Way I Feel" was one of the best selling records in Canada in 1967. He was nominated for a grammy in 1968 for "Did She Mention My Name". They also failed to mention that "If You Could Read My Mind" was one of the only Canadian songs to make it into the top 5 of the American charts BEFORE Canadian Content laws were brought in. Now, that happened in 1971, but it didn't stop them from showing Neil Young's "Heart of Gold" which was also from the same year. And to top it all off, Lightfoot is one of the most covered artists of all time (behind Dylan, the Beatles and Paul McCartney I believe). They should have devoted more time to him.

In any case, I think it's high time someone produced a real, in-depth documentary about Lightfoot. After all, he is Canada's native son and has done so much for this country, be it by putting it on the map musically, or assisting and influencing a whole new generation of songwriters. In fact, I'm surprised something hasn't yet been done, considering we almost lost him 2 years ago. Maybe we should start a petition to the CBC!

Just my two cents.

Kenyon
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Old 01-31-2006, 11:02 AM   #11
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Overall, a great show. A lot of familiar faces and some new ones which was interesting for someone like me, not having grown up in the 1960s.

I was a little disappointed with the content on Gord though. They gave him a segment of about 2 minutes, even though he was one of the most influential Canadian artists of the 1960s. I mean, think about the reaction "Black Day in July" got south of the border. Consider that "The Way I Feel" was one of the best selling records in Canada in 1967. He was nominated for a grammy in 1968 for "Did She Mention My Name". They also failed to mention that "If You Could Read My Mind" was one of the only Canadian songs to make it into the top 5 of the American charts BEFORE Canadian Content laws were brought in. Now, that happened in 1971, but it didn't stop them from showing Neil Young's "Heart of Gold" which was also from the same year. And to top it all off, Lightfoot is one of the most covered artists of all time (behind Dylan, the Beatles and Paul McCartney I believe). They should have devoted more time to him.

In any case, I think it's high time someone produced a real, in-depth documentary about Lightfoot. After all, he is Canada's native son and has done so much for this country, be it by putting it on the map musically, or assisting and influencing a whole new generation of songwriters. In fact, I'm surprised something hasn't yet been done, considering we almost lost him 2 years ago. Maybe we should start a petition to the CBC!

Just my two cents.

Kenyon
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Old 01-31-2006, 12:28 PM   #12
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Kenyon, I am at CBC constantly to do an up to date, comprehensive biography. All I've received back is that Gord/EMP are hard to pin down.

Having the book that the show is based on was a help with the chronology and how some groups had the same members and how some bands changed names.

I did love that they referred to Lightfoot as a "heart-throb" !!

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Old 01-31-2006, 12:28 PM   #13
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Kenyon, I am at CBC constantly to do an up to date, comprehensive biography. All I've received back is that Gord/EMP are hard to pin down.

Having the book that the show is based on was a help with the chronology and how some groups had the same members and how some bands changed names.

I did love that they referred to Lightfoot as a "heart-throb" !!

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Old 01-31-2006, 12:48 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kenyon:
I was a little disappointed with the content on Gord though. They gave him a segment of about 2 minutes, even though he was one of the most influential Canadian artists of the 1960s. Maybe we should start a petition to the CBC!
Kenyon
WHAT!!!Two minutes
That was all?? Shameful after all that raising of expectations.
the blurb had said amongst other things
"program features candid interviews with icons like Gordon Lightfoot, as well as rare performance clips of such songs as Lightfoot's "Early Morning Rain."
and most importantly for a Brit fan:-
"Gordon Lightfoot....."in separate performances on BBC's "In Concert"
I thought that I had read that there would be several other songs sung by Gord too but I am blessed if I can now find where I read that. Neither can I find the yellowing 1972 cutting from the BBC Radio Times that listed the songs sung on Gord's 1972 In Concert appearance which I intended to scan and display here, but luckily I sent a photocopy to Wayne Francis back in 1997 and he reproduced the tracklist on:-
http://www.lightfoot.ca/tvappear.htm:-
January 22, 1972
Summer Side Of Life
Saturday Clothes
For Loving Me
Affair On Eighth Avenue
If You Could Read My Mind
Steel Rail Blues
Ten Degrees And Getting Colder
Early Morning Rain.
I would have expected at least the whole of EMR
which would exceed 2 minutes on its own
and with all due respect to Ron Sexsmith if they incuded his IYCRMM that is not the same as featuring Gord himself
Nicholas Jennings at least on the evidence in one report and from his songbook booklet notes is a true lighthead so rather than pester the CBC would it not be better to contact Nicholas on your meritorious proposal?
"In any case, I think it's high time someone produced a real, in-depth documentary about Lightfoot"
Your not impossible mission young Kenyon since you brought the subject up is to devote your young self to this laudable project
John Fowles
The despicable Osama bin Laden
He's a man of ill fame,
who gives Islam a bad name,
Obsessed with his mission of mayhem.
from a Fitz parody at:-
http://www.amiright.com/parody/artis...ightfoot.shtml
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Old 01-31-2006, 12:48 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kenyon:
I was a little disappointed with the content on Gord though. They gave him a segment of about 2 minutes, even though he was one of the most influential Canadian artists of the 1960s. Maybe we should start a petition to the CBC!
Kenyon
WHAT!!!Two minutes
That was all?? Shameful after all that raising of expectations.
the blurb had said amongst other things
"program features candid interviews with icons like Gordon Lightfoot, as well as rare performance clips of such songs as Lightfoot's "Early Morning Rain."
and most importantly for a Brit fan:-
"Gordon Lightfoot....."in separate performances on BBC's "In Concert"
I thought that I had read that there would be several other songs sung by Gord too but I am blessed if I can now find where I read that. Neither can I find the yellowing 1972 cutting from the BBC Radio Times that listed the songs sung on Gord's 1972 In Concert appearance which I intended to scan and display here, but luckily I sent a photocopy to Wayne Francis back in 1997 and he reproduced the tracklist on:-
http://www.lightfoot.ca/tvappear.htm:-
January 22, 1972
Summer Side Of Life
Saturday Clothes
For Loving Me
Affair On Eighth Avenue
If You Could Read My Mind
Steel Rail Blues
Ten Degrees And Getting Colder
Early Morning Rain.
I would have expected at least the whole of EMR
which would exceed 2 minutes on its own
and with all due respect to Ron Sexsmith if they incuded his IYCRMM that is not the same as featuring Gord himself
Nicholas Jennings at least on the evidence in one report and from his songbook booklet notes is a true lighthead so rather than pester the CBC would it not be better to contact Nicholas on your meritorious proposal?
"In any case, I think it's high time someone produced a real, in-depth documentary about Lightfoot"
Your not impossible mission young Kenyon since you brought the subject up is to devote your young self to this laudable project
John Fowles
The despicable Osama bin Laden
He's a man of ill fame,
who gives Islam a bad name,
Obsessed with his mission of mayhem.
from a Fitz parody at:-
http://www.amiright.com/parody/artis...ightfoot.shtml
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Old 01-31-2006, 01:13 PM   #16
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Or perhaps Kenyon you can get together with the Queen Lighthead who on a sparse
Newsgroup thread at:-
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.m...bc3662ba778e25
has boasted
"I've got an autographed copy of the book!"
JohnFowles

As the book of law and order is taken in the hands

And you won’t read that book again

She lived by the book and she prayed every day

Use your imagination, try every trick in the book

he takes a battered book into his hand
and a surprising and useful find:-
book Gordon Lightfoot for your Special Occasion, Business Meeting
from:-
http://www.grabow.biz/Contemporary/GordonLightfoot.htm
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Old 01-31-2006, 01:13 PM   #17
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Or perhaps Kenyon you can get together with the Queen Lighthead who on a sparse
Newsgroup thread at:-
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.m...bc3662ba778e25
has boasted
"I've got an autographed copy of the book!"
JohnFowles

As the book of law and order is taken in the hands

And you won’t read that book again

She lived by the book and she prayed every day

Use your imagination, try every trick in the book

he takes a battered book into his hand
and a surprising and useful find:-
book Gordon Lightfoot for your Special Occasion, Business Meeting
from:-
http://www.grabow.biz/Contemporary/GordonLightfoot.htm
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Old 01-31-2006, 01:58 PM   #18
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I'm available to write 'the book' of the programme - a price, of course ... :D
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Old 01-31-2006, 02:12 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by SilverHeels:
I'm available to write 'the book' of the programme - a price, of course ... :D
What Bru just so somebody can pay you big bucks for the television rights to make a programme of your book aboot the programme aboot the original book... I don't think so!!
John Fowles
All You Have To Do Is Dream !!
Oops wrong songwriter(s)
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Old 01-31-2006, 02:12 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by SilverHeels:
I'm available to write 'the book' of the programme - a price, of course ... :D
What Bru just so somebody can pay you big bucks for the television rights to make a programme of your book aboot the programme aboot the original book... I don't think so!!
John Fowles
All You Have To Do Is Dream !!
Oops wrong songwriter(s)
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Old 01-31-2006, 02:53 PM   #21
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I caught the show on the tube last night. Although the Gord content was a bit slim, it did give a great overview on some of the lesser-known bands from the Great White North which influenced a lot of artists, but don't get much credit (or royalties for that matter).

I'm gonna have to read the book again now...then haunt the local used vinyl shop to try and pick up some gems.
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Old 01-31-2006, 02:53 PM   #22
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I caught the show on the tube last night. Although the Gord content was a bit slim, it did give a great overview on some of the lesser-known bands from the Great White North which influenced a lot of artists, but don't get much credit (or royalties for that matter).

I'm gonna have to read the book again now...then haunt the local used vinyl shop to try and pick up some gems.
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Old 01-31-2006, 03:39 PM   #23
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I watched the show last night, and was disappointed in the fact that Gord only got a couple of minutes, but then again, so did everyone else. That always happens with these documentaries. They have to fit everyone in. At least we can say Gord was one of the first artists mentioned. And I have to admit, some of the later bands were pretty obscure.
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Old 02-01-2006, 10:55 AM   #24
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there were so many bands/performers etc. back then that to at least show most of them made it impossible to have more than a few moments per group. I didn't even see a second of The Mercey Brothers who had tons of number one hits in Canada and are in the Country Music Hall of Fame.
Many of the "obscure" groups were well known in Canada.
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Old 02-01-2006, 10:55 AM   #25
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there were so many bands/performers etc. back then that to at least show most of them made it impossible to have more than a few moments per group. I didn't even see a second of The Mercey Brothers who had tons of number one hits in Canada and are in the Country Music Hall of Fame.
Many of the "obscure" groups were well known in Canada.
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