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Old 01-03-2014, 10:19 PM   #1
Bill
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Default RIP Phil Everly

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...#axzz2pONgWVTV
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:06 PM   #2
Jim Nasium
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

A sad loss, I and my wife were lucky enough to see Phil and Don in concert sometime ago and they were spot on, harmonies you die for.
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Old 01-04-2014, 06:18 PM   #3
charlene
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

sad news.. I loved Cathy's Clown... Back in 1962 I think, Lightfoot and his partner were not allowed at the 2nd Mariposa in Orillia (Lightfoot's hometown!) because they sounded too much like the Everly Brothers..lol... In 2000 at Mariposa when he was the headliner Gordon told me that story and sang a few bars of an Everly Brothers tune...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/singer-p...t-74-1.2483880 Phil Everly, whose high, close-harmony singing with his older brother, Don, made the Everly Brothers one of the biggest rock and country acts of the 1950s and early 1960s, died on Friday at the age of 74, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Everly died in the Los Angeles suburb of Burbank of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife Patti told the Times for a story on the paper's website.

Representatives for Phil Everly could not immediately be reached by Reuters for comment on Friday evening.

The Everly Brothers, whose hits included Wake Up Little Susie, Bye Bye Love and All I Have to Do Is Dream, profoundly influenced 1960s-era groups and singer-songwriters — from Beatles John Lennon and Paul McCartney, who early in their careers called themselves the Foreverly Brothers, to Simon and Garfunkel, the Byrds, the Hollies and the Beach Boys.

"Perhaps even more powerfully than Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers melded country with the emerging sound of Fifties rock & roll," Rolling Stone magazine said in placing the brothers at No. 33 on its list of the "100 Greatest Artists."

Phil and Don had an onstage breakup in 1973 that led to a decade-long estrangement, but Phil told Time magazine their relationship had endured.

"Don and I are infamous for our split," Phil said, "but we're closer than most brothers. Harmony singing requires that you enlarge yourself, not use any kind of suppression. Harmony is the ultimate love."`
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Old 01-04-2014, 06:19 PM   #4
charlene
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

Burton Cummings and Don Everly:
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Old 01-04-2014, 06:20 PM   #5
charlene
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

http://www.billboard.com/articles/ne...ref_map=%5B%5D

VIDEO AND PICS AT LINK ABOVE

Don Everly has released a statement on the passing of his little brother Phil, who died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on Friday. The elder Everly writes that the love they shared "will always be deeper than any earthly differences we might have had" during their wildly successful career together.

•"I loved my brother very much. I always thought I'd be the one to go first. I was listening to one of my favorite songs that Phil wrote and had an extreme emotional moment just before I got the news of his passing. I took that as a special spiritual message from Phil saying good-bye. Our love was and will always be deeper than any earthly differences we might have had. The world might be mourning an Everly Brother, but I'm mourning my brother Phil Everly. My wife Adela and I are touched by all the tributes we're seeing for Phil and we thank you for allowing us to grieve in private at this incredibly difficult time."

On Friday, Phil Everly's wife, Patti, told the Los Angeles Times that the singer's lung disease was contracted through a lifetime of smoking and that the family was "absolutely heartbroken."

Billboard recently ranked the duo, who charted 31 singles on the Hot 100, including 12 top 10 hits, as the 66th-biggest act in the 55-year history of the chart. They are the Hot 100 chart's third biggest duo ever, following Daryl Hall & John Oates, and the Carpenters.
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:49 PM   #6
Borderstone
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

Wow. I was so wrapped up in everything yesterday,I didn't
hear about this until I logged on and read IMDb's front page article.

I wasn't even born yet when the Everly's had their success but I did first hear them on a 70s album called "Fonzie's Favorites",a collection of 1950s hits,which included their "Bird Dog" .Their songs were also used on Happy Days itself.

The two had a great harmony together,no question and blended rock,pop & country in what seemed like an effortless way. No doubt that's why they had an impressive 27 top 40 hits on The Billboard Pop Charts (Out of 75 singles total).

Their first single "Keep A Lovin' Me",on Columbia,didn't make any chart but Bye,Bye Love broke them natioanlly in '57. Their final hit was "Bowling Green" in 1967,reaching #40. They had 17 more singles up to 1988 but fared a bit better on the country charts.

The Everly Brothers then decided to take time off from performing, announcing their final performance together would be on July 14, 1973, at Knotts Berry Farm in California.

Unfortunately, high tensions between the two began to surface during the show as the band skipped several songs and the brothers began to argue on stage (It's said Don, Phil and the band had engaged in some drinking backstage before the show.)

Finally, Don threw his guitar on the ground smashing it, saying: "I'm through being an Everly Brother", and stormed off the stage, while Phil went on performing the rest of the numbers by himself. amidst much acrimony. Phil ended up telling the crowd "The Everly Brothers died ten years ago".

Reportedly, they did not speak to each other for almost a decade, except at their father's funeral in 1975. They reunited in 1983 and remained close both as artists and brothers.

RIP Phil Everly
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Last edited by Borderstone; 01-05-2014 at 06:54 PM.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:45 PM   #7
charlene
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/20..._brothers.html

By: David Bauder Associated Press, Published on Sat Jan 04 2014

NEW YORK, N.Y.—Art Garfunkel answered the door to his Manhattan apartment holding a framed black-and-white picture of two smiling men. It was a test.
Correctly identifying Phil and Don Everly in the picture would reveal me as a journalist knowledgeable about music and the roots of Garfunkel’s career. Flustered, I failed. It should have been obvious.
The Everly Brothers, who will blend their voices no more following Phil’s death at 74 Friday from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, were the architects of rock ’n’ roll harmony. Simon & Garfunkel were unimaginable without them. John Lennon and Paul McCartney took their cues, too. Their harmonies (and don’t forget George Harrison) formed the bedrock of the Beatles’ sound.

Like Garfunkel, Phil sang the high notes. He had the lighter hair. He would step away from the microphone, like on “Cathy’s Clown,” to let older brother Don sing a few lines alone and you noticed how unremarkable Don’s voice was unadorned. Only when that voice merged with his brother’s as a single, new voice did it become special.
The Everly Brothers’ reign on the pop charts was relatively short, from the mid-1950s until the British Invasion swept in a new generation in the early 1960s. The Everlys receded, but it was plain the newcomers had been listening.
Sweet as they sounded, their hits resonated because they taught a huge postwar II generation as it was growing up that love wasn’t all roses, blue skies and candy. “Bye, bye love,” they sang. “Bye, bye happiness. Hello loneliness. I think I’m a-gonna cry.”
In the sumptuous “All I Have to Do is Dream,” the romance is frustratingly unrequited. “I need you so, that I could die,” they sang. “When Will I Be Loved,” they wondered. Even success was fraught with worry: the teenagers in “Wake Up Little Susie” fretted over whether anyone would believe their excuses about falling asleep while watching a movie.
With their two acoustic guitars and a sound that appealed to both pop and country audiences, the Everlys would be categorized today as country. Thankfully, things were freer when they were young and their music was heard by everyone.

Phil and Don Everly pioneered another rock staple: feuding partners, often brothers, who were never as compelling apart as they were together. Phil famously threw down his guitar and walked offstage during a 1973 gig in California, prompting Don to tell the crowd, “The Everly Brothers died 10 years ago.” Ray and Dave Davies of the Kinks carried on that fractious tradition, as did Noel and Liam Gallagher of Oasis.
Simon & Garfunkel invited the Everly Brothers to be their opening act for a 2003 tour. Paul Simon, often exasperated by his on-again, off-again partner and quite accomplished on his own, couldn’t help but be amused by the irony of two partnerships in which real-life harmony didn’t match what was onstage. Phil and Don hadn’t seen each other for three years before meeting in the parking lot before the first show.
“They unpacked their guitars — those famous black guitars — and they opened their mouths and started to sing,” Simon told Rolling Stone magazine. “And after all these years, it was still that sound I fell in love with as a kid. It was still perfect.”
Famous fans paid their debts. Simon and Garfunkel could have invited anyone for that 2003 tour. McCartney opened the door for “Phil and Don” in his 1976 hit “Let ’Em In” and wrote the single “On the Wings of a Nightingale” for their 1984 reunion. Rockpile partners Dave Edmunds and Nick Lowe recorded an EP of Everly covers and Edmunds produced the brothers’ EB 84 album.

The best tribute always comes when singers discover that the sound of their voices together creates a magic that isn’t there when each is alone, like John Paul White and Joy Williams of the too aptly named The Civil Wars. Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers are introducing harmony to a new generation. The Jayhawks were special because of how Gary Louris’ and Mark Olson’s voices merged.
“You realize it’s something that doesn’t come around in everybody’s lifetime, having a kind of chemistry like this,” Louris, who sang the high notes, told The Associated Press after reuniting with Olson in 2011.
Phil’s death comes just as Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day and Norah Jones, are on the charts with “Foreverly,” a song-for-song cover of the Everly Brothers’ 1958 album “Songs Our Daddy Taught Us.” (Their father was a country music musician in his own right.)

Each have beautiful, expressive voices — Armstrong showing a depth and versatility he can’t often display in Green Day. Truthfully, though, those voices sit side by side. They don’t become better together. They don’t become one voice.
For that, we had Phil and Don Everly.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:45 PM   #8
charlene
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Default Re: RIP Phil Everly

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/20..._brothers.html

By: David Bauder Associated Press, Published on Sat Jan 04 2014

NEW YORK, N.Y.—Art Garfunkel answered the door to his Manhattan apartment holding a framed black-and-white picture of two smiling men. It was a test.
Correctly identifying Phil and Don Everly in the picture would reveal me as a journalist knowledgeable about music and the roots of Garfunkel’s career. Flustered, I failed. It should have been obvious.
The Everly Brothers, who will blend their voices no more following Phil’s death at 74 Friday from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, were the architects of rock ’n’ roll harmony. Simon & Garfunkel were unimaginable without them. John Lennon and Paul McCartney took their cues, too. Their harmonies (and don’t forget George Harrison) formed the bedrock of the Beatles’ sound.

Like Garfunkel, Phil sang the high notes. He had the lighter hair. He would step away from the microphone, like on “Cathy’s Clown,” to let older brother Don sing a few lines alone and you noticed how unremarkable Don’s voice was unadorned. Only when that voice merged with his brother’s as a single, new voice did it become special.
The Everly Brothers’ reign on the pop charts was relatively short, from the mid-1950s until the British Invasion swept in a new generation in the early 1960s. The Everlys receded, but it was plain the newcomers had been listening.
Sweet as they sounded, their hits resonated because they taught a huge postwar II generation as it was growing up that love wasn’t all roses, blue skies and candy. “Bye, bye love,” they sang. “Bye, bye happiness. Hello loneliness. I think I’m a-gonna cry.”
In the sumptuous “All I Have to Do is Dream,” the romance is frustratingly unrequited. “I need you so, that I could die,” they sang. “When Will I Be Loved,” they wondered. Even success was fraught with worry: the teenagers in “Wake Up Little Susie” fretted over whether anyone would believe their excuses about falling asleep while watching a movie.
With their two acoustic guitars and a sound that appealed to both pop and country audiences, the Everlys would be categorized today as country. Thankfully, things were freer when they were young and their music was heard by everyone.

Phil and Don Everly pioneered another rock staple: feuding partners, often brothers, who were never as compelling apart as they were together. Phil famously threw down his guitar and walked offstage during a 1973 gig in California, prompting Don to tell the crowd, “The Everly Brothers died 10 years ago.” Ray and Dave Davies of the Kinks carried on that fractious tradition, as did Noel and Liam Gallagher of Oasis.
Simon & Garfunkel invited the Everly Brothers to be their opening act for a 2003 tour. Paul Simon, often exasperated by his on-again, off-again partner and quite accomplished on his own, couldn’t help but be amused by the irony of two partnerships in which real-life harmony didn’t match what was onstage. Phil and Don hadn’t seen each other for three years before meeting in the parking lot before the first show.
“They unpacked their guitars — those famous black guitars — and they opened their mouths and started to sing,” Simon told Rolling Stone magazine. “And after all these years, it was still that sound I fell in love with as a kid. It was still perfect.”
Famous fans paid their debts. Simon and Garfunkel could have invited anyone for that 2003 tour. McCartney opened the door for “Phil and Don” in his 1976 hit “Let ’Em In” and wrote the single “On the Wings of a Nightingale” for their 1984 reunion. Rockpile partners Dave Edmunds and Nick Lowe recorded an EP of Everly covers and Edmunds produced the brothers’ EB 84 album.

The best tribute always comes when singers discover that the sound of their voices together creates a magic that isn’t there when each is alone, like John Paul White and Joy Williams of the too aptly named The Civil Wars. Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers are introducing harmony to a new generation. The Jayhawks were special because of how Gary Louris’ and Mark Olson’s voices merged.
“You realize it’s something that doesn’t come around in everybody’s lifetime, having a kind of chemistry like this,” Louris, who sang the high notes, told The Associated Press after reuniting with Olson in 2011.
Phil’s death comes just as Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day and Norah Jones, are on the charts with “Foreverly,” a song-for-song cover of the Everly Brothers’ 1958 album “Songs Our Daddy Taught Us.” (Their father was a country music musician in his own right.)

Each have beautiful, expressive voices — Armstrong showing a depth and versatility he can’t often display in Green Day. Truthfully, though, those voices sit side by side. They don’t become better together. They don’t become one voice.
For that, we had Phil and Don Everly.
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